There are 2 definitions of jib in English:

jib1

Syllabification: jib

noun

1 Sailing A triangular staysail set forward of the forwardmost mast.
More example sentences
  • I have seen others opt for a cutter-type arrangement leaving the small jib and adding a genoa.
  • The rig is fractional and most boats were sold with a mainsail and 120% jib as standard equipment.
  • Though there were as many misses as hits, the main sail, jib, and one other were burning.
2The projecting arm of a crane.
More example sentences
  • The jib or projecting arm of a crane probably derives from gibbet, and gibe and gybe are often written jibe.
  • Overhead power cables broke the fall of the crane as the jib of the machine tore a gaping hole in the roof of the single storey premises.
  • In yesterday's windy conditions, the front jib of the crane dangled at the former gasometer site, the damaged part swaying towards buildings.

Origin

mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

Phrases

the cut of someone's jib

informal , dated Someone’s appearance or demeanor.
More example sentences
  • You can tell a man's character by the cut of his jib.
  • I have no idea what he is talking about, but dammit, I like the cut of his jib.
  • He is reputedly a fan of Western films and, going by the cut of his jib, country-and-western music.

Definition of jib in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of jib in English:

jib2

Syllabification: jib

verb (jibs, jibbing, jibbed)

[no object]
1(Of an animal, especially a horse) stop and refuse to go on: he jibbed at the final fence
More example sentences
  • The horses slithered down the shallow bank and onto the glassy surface at a rapid trot, but the black was mistrustful of the insecure footing and jibbed skittishly.
1.1(Of a person) be unwilling to do or accept something: he jibs at paying large bills
More example sentences
  • Dealing with declaration one, I understood that you were jibbing at the word ‘unlawfully’ in Mr Clayton's draft.
  • American scholars have jibbed at adopting this usage, and many prefer terms without the denotative baggage of caste, such as ‘status groups.’
  • It jibbed at invading England in 1940, though it did undertake a number of amphibious operations in the Baltic Sea in June 1941, and later in the Black Sea.

Origin

early 19th century: perhaps related to French regimber (earlier regiber) 'to buck, rear'; compare with jibe3.

Derivatives

jibber

noun
More example sentences
  • The latest piece of jibber to emanate from the mouth of Dear Leader Howard is his $900 offer for apprentices to buy a box to keep him in.
  • So Mr UCDU, how about creating a namshub that could make people understand your jibber?

Definition of jib in: