There are 2 main definitions of league in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

league1

Syllabification: league
Pronunciation: /lēɡ
 
/

noun

1A collection of people, countries, or groups that combine for a particular purpose, typically mutual protection or cooperation: the League of Nations
More example sentences
  • When the Constitution was submitted to referendum, short-lived federation leagues were formed in many centres to campaign for a ‘yes’ vote.
  • The league has taken the government to court over the fact that children were not being protected from bullying, assault and self-harm.
  • Finally, the league inaugurated the idea of collective economic sanctions.
Synonyms
1.1An agreement to combine for a particular purpose.
Example sentences
  • This is about the integrity of a league and an agreement: A deal is a deal.
2A group of sports clubs that play each other over a period for a championship.
Example sentences
  • The cloud is kicked up from so many teams scrambling for the league championship.
  • Players in the Premiership are playing in that league for a reason and that goes for players in Divisions One, Two and Three.
  • It made sense, of course, since the hockey league he played for was beginning their Christmas break.
Synonyms
big league(s), major league(s), minor league(s), American League, National League, intramural league, Little League, bush league
2.1The contest for the championship of a league: the year we won the league
More example sentences
  • At this moment it is easier to win the league than the Champions League or even the FA Cup.
  • Fair enough, they've had a couple of good results, but winning the Champions league?
  • Twice they won the league and twice lost in the play-offs that guaranteed promotion.
3A class or category of quality or excellence: the two men were not in the same league Jack’s in a league of his own
More example sentences
  • We were totally out of our league, however, in the fine wines category and after the questions on Chinese dynasties we were in last place.
  • She's out of her league, according to the class consciousness of the time.
  • When it comes to pulling political strokes, they are a class act, in a league of their own.
Synonyms
class, group, circle, category, level

verb (leagues, leaguing, leagued)

[no object] Back to top  
Join in a league or alliance: Oscar had leagued with other construction firms
More example sentences
  • The marquess of Montrose, initially a Covenanter, leagued with the Irish to invade in the north-west and with Alasdair MacColla turned a feud between the Scots-Irish MacDonalds and Argyll's Campbells into a powerful threat.
  • And since then it has been leagued with various investigations into the historical Jesus.
  • His policies of appeasement leagued him frequently with the prudent Phocion.
Synonyms
ally, join forces, join together, unite, band together, affiliate, combine, amalgamate, confederate, team up, join up

Origin

late Middle English (denoting a compact for mutual protection or advantage): via French from Italian lega, from legare 'to bind', from Latin ligare.

Phrases

in league

1
Conspiring with another or others: he is in league with the devil
More example sentences
  • There's no doubt he can still sing, but now we know he isn't actually in league with the Devil, that's not enough anymore.
  • Intriguingly for those who recognize him, the part has him in league with his uncles in the White House.
  • In more refined versions, the American government is in league with the aliens and is assisting them in their abduction programme.
Synonyms
collaborating with, cooperating with, in alliance with, allied with, conspiring with, hand in glove with
informal in cahoots with, in bed with

Definition of league in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

There are 2 main definitions of league in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

league2

Syllabification: league
Pronunciation: /lēɡ
 
/

noun

A former measure of distance by land, usually about three miles.
Example sentences
  • In 1803 Napoleon exiled her to twenty leagues, roughly fifty miles, from Paris.
  • The tunnel measured ten leagues east to west, and it covered that distance in an arrow-straight line.
  • She was not permitted to travel more than two leagues (five miles) from Coppet and began to receive word that orders for her arrest were pending.

Origin

late Middle English: from late Latin leuga, leuca, late Greek leugē, or from Provençal lega (modern French lieue).

Definition of league in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.