Definition of leeward in English:

leeward

Syllabification: lee·ward
Pronunciation: /ˈlēwərd, ˈlo͞oərd
 
 
/

adjective & adverb

On or toward the side sheltered from the wind or toward which the wind is blowing; downwind: [as adjective]: the leeward side of the house [as adverb]: we pitched our tents leeward of a hill Contrasted with windward.
More example sentences
  • On the leeward side, the best beaches can be found in the southern half of the island.
  • He does not pause, but goes straight to work on the leeward side of the shed with his hand axe.
  • Looking for shelter, he finds himself a place to sit in the leeward side of a snowdrift.

noun

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The side sheltered or away from the wind: the ship was drifting to leeward
More example sentences
  • Start with helms staggered on the beach by skill factor (as decided by the fleet captain) from windward to leeward.
  • The mast is quite flexible, and, with this much sail and no standing riggings, the top is prone to twist to leeward considerably when the wind picks up.
  • The problem with sailing in strong winds with light crews, is that we're both so high up above the boom, we can't see much to leeward, as the sails block our view.

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