Definition of loathsome in English:

loathsome

Syllabification: loath·some
Pronunciation: /ˈlōTHsəm
 
, ˈlōT͟Hsəm
 
/

adjective

Causing hatred or disgust; repulsive: this loathsome little swine
More example sentences
  • The judge had directed the jury to consider whether the material under consideration was repulsive, filthy, loathsome and lewd.
  • It was loathsome, it was disgusting, and it was a feeling that Laurel had never experienced.
  • Not a great surprise, and in all possibility a victory for freedom of speech, even if his comments were utterly offensive and loathsome.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from archaic loath 'disgust, loathing' + -some1.

Derivatives

loathsomely

adverb
More example sentences
  • Right away we're tipped off to some of the film's more loathsomely precious qualities when we see that Evie works at a Kiddie Acres theme park, serving hot dogs while dressed in a giant bunny suit.
  • Without bothering to listen to whatever pathetic excuse he had conjured up, I marched right up to Emily, who was simpering and smirking as if she had somehow managed to win whatever war that was between us, and glared at her loathsomely.
  • He gave her a look that was mostly apologetic, despite his continuing awareness that she was loathsomely evil and contaminating him with every moment they remained in the room together.

loathsomeness

noun
More example sentences
  • Never mind, rather like buses, if you miss one chance to comment on the tabloids insensitivity, self-aggrandisement, condescension and general loathsomeness there bound to be another chance coming along shortly.
  • But there is an admirable lack of the loathsomeness of punning headlines; everywhere, the book plays it straight, and plays it true.
  • Loathsome as it is to try to beg for your life when you were willing to kill others, it is at least a very human form of loathsomeness.

Definition of loathsome in:

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