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lobscouse

Syllabification: lob·scouse
Pronunciation: /ˈläbskous
 
/

Definition of lobscouse in English:

noun

A stew formerly eaten by sailors, consisting of meat, vegetables, and hardtack.
Example sentences
  • Sailors had various methods for making hard tack palatable, e.g. crumbling it into the dish called lobscouse.
  • ‘Well, sir,’ said Killick, ‘Joe Plaice says he would venture upon a lobscouse, and Jemmy Ducks believes he could manage a goose-pie.’

Origin

early 18th century: of unknown origin; compare with Dutch lapskous, Danish and Norwegian lapskaus, and German Lapskaus.

More
  • Scouse from (mid 19th century):

    The success of the Beatles and other Liverpool groups and singers in the 1960s focused attention on their native city, and the words Scouse and Scouser became widely familiar in Britain. They represent shortenings of lobscouse, a stew made with meat, vegetables, and ship's biscuit formerly eaten by sailors and so a staple food in the thriving port of Liverpool. Lobscouse is recorded from the early 18th century, but its origin is unknown. Before the 1960s Scouse meaning ‘Liverpudlian’ appeared in print only in a 1945 report of a trial, where a witness used the word and a puzzled judge asked for an explanation, although it was recorded 100 years earlier for the food.

Words that rhyme with lobscouse

workhousewoodlouse

Definition of lobscouse in:

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