Definition of lodge in English:

lodge

Syllabification: lodge
Pronunciation: /läj
 
/

noun

1A small house at the gates of a park or in the grounds of a large house, typically occupied by a gatekeeper, gardener, or other employee.
More example sentences
  • The house, the entrance lodge and garden of just over an acre comprise lot one.
  • The Westward Group, the developer, is hoping to complete the two gate lodges and a three-bedroom house in the first phase in the coming months.
  • It was agreed that Gloria would stay for three weeks and would occupy the lodge in the garden of the Wood's house some 30 yards away.
Synonyms
1.1A small country house occupied in season for sports such as hunting, shooting, fishing, and skiing: a hunting lodge
More example sentences
  • An itinerant court stayed at urban and rural palaces and hunting lodges.
  • Originally built in 1703 as a hunting lodge, it doubled as a soup kitchen during the Great Hunger.
  • She has not had the easiest person to live with, and for most of our married life our house has looked much more like a hunting lodge than a home.
Synonyms
house, cottage, cabin, chalet
1.2A large house or hotel: Cumberland Lodge
1.3A porter’s quarters at the main entrance of a college or other large building.
More example sentences
  • This building was the main part of the lodge and flanking it were two dorms, which would house the girls and the boys separately.
  • The film, of which there is only one existing copy in the UK, has now arrived and is being stored in padlocked cans in the College lodge, and is due to be screened next week.
  • Do the ducks still nest next to the porter's lodge near Staircase 1?
1.4The residence of a head of a college, especially at Cambridge.
1.5An American Indian hut.
More example sentences
  • Sweat lodges are traditionally low, windowless, insulated domes constructed of willow branches.
1.6A beaver’s den.
More example sentences
  • Beaver lodges are also the work of a master builder.
  • Like beavers, muskrats build lodges out of sticks, twigs, cattails and bulrushes, reinforcing them with mud.
  • In the next scene, he builds an airy dome, something like a beaver lodge, out of bleached driftwood.
Synonyms
den, lair, hole, set; retreat, haunt, shelter
2A branch or meeting place of an organization such as the Freemasons.
More example sentences
  • Some of their public meetings and conventions were recorded, but I have been unable to locate minutes from any secret meetings of individual lodges.
  • The Freemasons had dissolved their lodges under government pressure, and state employees in all professions were subject to dismissal for left-wing associations.
  • Towns were also cultural centres, the largest of which, by the second half of the eighteenth century, possessed theatres, masonic lodges, reading clubs, and newspapers.
Synonyms
hall, clubhouse, meeting room

verb

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1 [with object] Present (a complaint, appeal, claim, etc.) formally to the proper authorities: he has 28 days in which to lodge an appeal
More example sentences
  • This matter would be considered when the application was formally lodged to the Local Authority.
  • It is not the function of this Tribunal to comment on whether the unfair dismissal claim lodged by the Appellant was justified or not as the matter was settled.
  • They cannot leave it to the initiative of the next of kin either to lodge a formal complaint or to take responsibility for the conduct of the investigative procedures.
Synonyms
submit, register, enter, put forward, advance, lay, present, tender, proffer, put on record, record, file
1.1 (lodge something in/with) Leave money or a valuable item in (a place) or with (someone) for safekeeping.
More example sentences
  • It's understood Mrs Walsh intended to lodge the money in the bank, but the cash, all in notes, has yet to be recovered.
  • Cllr Durcan said if the CPO was used the council could lodge the money in an account and leave it to the three people involved to sort out the payments.
  • Two of the syndicate members lodged the ticket with the Bank of Ireland on New Year's Eve, but when they went to retrieve it last Friday the bank had to admit it had misplaced the ticket.
2Make or become firmly fixed or embedded in a particular place: [with object]: they had to remove a bullet lodged near his spine [no object]: figurative the image had lodged in her mind
More example sentences
  • The bullet lodged near his pelvis and cannot be safely removed.
  • The bullet lodged so near the brain that he suffered atrocious headaches for the next twenty years.
  • A week ago last Friday is lodged firmly in my mind as the night I arrived home from work to find army, police and council workers busy evacuating my street.
Synonyms
become fixed, embed itself, become embedded, become implanted, get/become stuck, stick, catch, become caught, wedge
3 [no object] Stay or sleep in another person’s house, paying money for one’s accommodations: the man who lodged in the room next door
More example sentences
  • He lodged in a house in High Saint Agnesgate where he wrote mathematical treatise under his own name as well as working on part of Through the Looking Glass.
  • The composer Handel lodged in the house for three years towards the end of his life while the scientist Henry Cavendish had a room here during his youth.
  • By this stage we had reached the house where I lodged and as we walked in the front door, both carrying a cardboard box, one of the other female lodgers did a double take.
Synonyms
reside, board, stay, live, rent rooms, be put up, be quartered, room
archaic abide
3.1 [with object] Provide (someone) with a place to sleep or stay in return for payment.
More example sentences
  • Although bride and groom are lodged in separate institutions, previous clients say this temporary separation does enhance their relationship.
  • Nevis came next, and we were lodged again beside the sea, this time in the huge Four Seasons hotel, which has taken over the best beach on the island.
  • I was lodged with her when the Russians invaded Czechoslovakia.
Synonyms
4 [with object] (Of wind or rain) flatten (a standing crop): (as adjective lodged) rain that soaks standing or lodged crops
More example sentences
  • Lodging doubles the rate of decline in digestibility so lodged crops should be harvested as soon as possible.
  • Good crop residue distribution is even more important in cutting lodged wheat.
  • Some equipment companies have attachments for the combine header to help pick up lodged corn.
4.1 [no object] (Of a crop) be flattened by wind or rain.
More example sentences
  • Much of the wheat and the other small grains lodged and sprouted before harvest.
  • The wheat's pretty much a loss, the oats lodged, the weeds are having a field day and the leaf hoppers worked over the alfalfa and potatoes.
  • Plants exhibiting rootless corn symptoms have either lodged and are laying on the ground or are ready to lodge.

Origin

Middle English loge, via Old French loge 'arbor, hut' from medieval Latin laubia, lobia (see lobby), of Germanic origin; related to German Laube 'arbor'.

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