There are 2 main definitions of loom in English:

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loom1

Syllabification: loom
Pronunciation: /lo͞om
 
/

noun

An apparatus for making fabric by weaving yarn or thread.
Example sentences
  • Their elaborate fabrics, woven on looms from cotton and alpaca wool, are known today because they were used in a type of mummification process.
  • We know that they hunted animals with bows and arrows and that they wove textiles using looms.
  • I pulled up everything I could find on the laptop pertaining to weaving, textiles, looms and spinning.

Origin

Old English gelōma 'tool', shortened to lome in Middle English.

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There are 2 main definitions of loom in English:

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loom2

Syllabification: loom
Pronunciation: /lo͞om
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Appear as a shadowy form, especially one that is large or threatening: vehicles loomed out of the darkness
More example sentences
  • As we swam to the first buoy, we noticed strange shapes looming up at us from beneath the surface.
  • A dark shape loomed before him and he fell backwards, giving a yelp of dismay at his outline.
  • Against the dull, grey sky, a selection of dark shapes loomed before Blaze.
Synonyms
emerge, appear, come into view, take shape, materialize, reveal itself
1.1(Of an event regarded as ominous or threatening) seem about to happen: there is a crisis looming higher mortgage rates loomed large last night
More example sentences
  • Once well-deserved celebrations waned, the daunting task of finding a space loomed large.
  • Despite police alerting people on the new rule, uncertainty loomed large on city roads till afternoon.
  • My sense is that the probability of such an event looms nearer and grows larger with each passing day.
Synonyms
be imminent, be on the horizon, impend, threaten, brew, be just around the corner, be in the air/wind
dominate, be important, be significant, be of consequence;
count, matter

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
1A vague and often exaggerated first appearance of an object seen in darkness or fog, especially at sea: the loom of the land ahead
More example sentences
  • His memoirs state that he was "conscious of the loom of the land about 3 am", little more than an hour before the landing.
  • From the Monday to the Thursday I doubt whether it was ever possible from our windows in Baker Street to see the loom of the opposite houses.
1.1The dim reflection by cloud or haze of a light that is not directly visible, e.g., from a lighthouse over the horizon.
Example sentences
  • Rock, nothing but ocean waves for another 170 miles until the loom of the Fastnet light lifts above the horizon.
  • Thousands pay homage every year and the loom of its light is a sight for seafarers' eyes.
  • In the distance, straight ahead off the bow, I could see the loom of the green five-second light of the Block Island lighthouse.

Origin

mid 16th century: probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with East Frisian lōmen 'move slowly', Middle High German lüemen 'be weary'.

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