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lullaby

Syllabification: lull·a·by
Pronunciation: /ˈlələˌbī
 
/

Definition of lullaby in English:

noun (plural lullabies)

A quiet, gentle song sung to send a child to sleep.
Example sentences
  • Participants learned the old lullabies and folk songs of their mothers and grandmothers joyfully and enthusiastically.
  • Their traditional music includes work songs, hymns, lullabies, ballads, and healing songs.
  • The music is Celtic-Emerald Isle - the songs are a lullaby.
Synonyms

verb (lullabies, lullabying, lullabied)

[with object] rare Back to top  
Sing to (someone) to get them to go to sleep: she lullabied us, she fed us
More example sentences
  • For the next ten years until the death of Philip V (the first Spanish Bourbon and father of the first Neapolitan Bourbon), Farinelli lullabied the depressed king to sleep with the same four songs every night!
  • Another such piece, ‘Child Falling Asleep,’ lulls the mind into a sleepy state, much as he might have imagined lullabying his own children at bedtime.
  • Sunshine will appeal to story group times at schools and libraries, as well as parents and grandparents lullabying their children to sleep at bedtime.

Origin

mid 16th century: from lull + bye-bye, a sound used as a refrain in lullabies.

Words that rhyme with lullaby

syllabihushaby

Definition of lullaby in:

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