There are 2 main definitions of lump in English:

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lump1

Syllabification: lump
Pronunciation: /ləmp
 
/

noun

1A compact mass of a substance, especially one without a definite or regular shape: there was a lump of ice floating in the milk
More example sentences
  • After everyone had eaten, she handed them each a lump of the sticky substance.
  • Alex stared down at the lump of an unknown substance currently residing on his lunch tray.
  • Michael will talk about the book and use a lump of stone and a piece of gold to illustrate themes of alchemy.
Synonyms
chunk, hunk, piece, mass, block, wedge, slab, cake, nugget, ball, brick, cube, pat, knob, clod, gobbet, dollop, wad
informal glob, gob
1.1A swelling under the skin, especially one caused by injury or disease: he was unhurt apart from a huge lump on his head
More example sentences
  • Some problems may be detected-and treated-early by examining your pet weekly for lumps, bumps and skin irritations.
  • I know of people who suffered the lumps and bumps of skin cancers and the inevitable dire consequences.
  • From March to September last year, he believed he had beaten the disease but the lump in his neck returned and on October 16 he was told the cancer had returned.
Synonyms
1.2A small cube of sugar.
Example sentences
  • In contrast, having them sing is like using two lumps of sugar when one will do.
  • She poured herself a cup of tea, adding three lumps of sugar since she loved sweets, and sipped it noisily.
  • Feeding him a few lumps of sugar, she was finally able to coax him into allowing her to put on his saddle.
1.3 informal A heavy, ungainly, or slow-witted person: I wouldn’t stand a chance against a big lump like you
More example sentences
  • So long as he and his fellow big lumps fulfil their obligations, Celtic will be through to the third round.
  • They were just wonderful, beyond wonderful for such a bunch of big hairy lumps, and it was great to see them playing a small-ish venue.
  • Getting stared at by a young girl still fascinated by big western lumps?

verb

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1 [with object] Put in an indiscriminate mass or group; treat as alike without regard for particulars: Hong Kong and Bangkok tend to be lumped together in travel brochures he tends to be lumped in with the crowd of controversial businessmen
More example sentences
  • Defense contractors, for instance, might object to being lumped in with gaming companies or brewers.
  • Hence, I don't know whether this latest release deserves to be lumped in with those earlier works.
  • The very thought that I will be lumped in with lovers of such horrid dreck makes me physically ill.
Synonyms
combine, put together, group, bunch, aggregate, unite, pool, merge, collect, throw together, consider together
1.1 [no object] (In taxonomy) classify plants or animals in relatively inclusive groups, disregarding minor variations.
Example sentences
  • Genetic information can be used to classify and lump, split and separate, identify and admit.
2 [no object] (lump along) Proceed heavily or awkwardly: I came lumping along behind him
More example sentences
  • If we can see fanaticists as being our friends because they are not very different from ourselves, then we might let them just lump along.
  • It's a car that can lump along in traffic with the occupants giving the hoi polloi the royal wave, or a car that can be pushed and driven enthusiastically.
  • They have lots of teeth and just kind of lump along minding their own business.

Origin

Middle English: perhaps from a Germanic base meaning 'shapeless piece'; compare with Danish lump 'lump', Norwegian and Swedish dialect lump 'block, log', and Dutch lomp 'rag'.

More
  • lumber from (Late Middle English):

    The earliest lumber in English meant ‘to move in a slow, heavy, awkward way’. Its origin is not known, but its form may have been intended to suggest clumsiness or heaviness, rather like lump (Middle English). This may have been the origin of lumber in the sense ‘disused furniture and articles that take up space’, but people also associated the term with the old word lumber meaning ‘a pawnbroker's shop’, which was an alteration of Lombard or ‘person from Lombardy’. The mainly North American sense ‘timber sawn into rough planks’ appears to be a development of the ‘disused furniture’ meaning, as is the verb to be lumbered or burdened with something unwanted. The slang phrase in lumber, ‘in trouble’, originally meant ‘in pawn, pawned’.

Phrases

a lump in the throat

1
A feeling of tightness or dryness in the throat caused by strong emotion, especially sadness: there was a lump in her throat as she gazed down at her uncle’s gaunt features
More example sentences
  • There are others, potential nominees whom the president might have chosen, who probably also feel a lump in the throat when they think about the Supreme Court, but it is caused by anger rather than reverence.
  • It's a film that would have caused a lump in the throat, had the director just built a plot around a man whose biological and mental age are inversely proportional - he is an adult with the mind of a seven-year-old.
  • Tears flowed freely and as their schoolmates roared No Surrender and You'll Never Walk Alone to the skies, even the neutral observer could feel the presence of a lump in the throat.

take (or get) one's lumps

2
informal , chiefly North American Suffer punishment; be attacked or defeated.
Example sentences
  • Chiropractors have been taking their lumps lately.
  • But these problems are mounting and Republicans may have to take their lumps in the midterm elections instead.
  • It's time for the behemoths of the airline industry to take their lumps.
Synonyms

Words that rhyme with lump

bump, chump, clump, crump, dump, flump, frump, gazump, grump, hump, jump, outjump, plump, pump, rump, scrump, slump, stump, sump, thump, trump, tump, ump, whump

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There are 2 main definitions of lump in English:

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lump2

Syllabification: lump
Pronunciation: /ləmp
 
/

verb

[with object] (lump it) informal
Accept or tolerate a disagreeable situation whether one likes it or not: you can like it or lump it but I’ve got to work
More example sentences
  • But now they have got all the equipment installed, I think we are going to have to like it or lump it.
  • Democracy didn't once enter the equation and the seven counties who had meticulously crafted suitable wordings so that the issue could be debated were effectively told to like it or lump it.
  • Sometimes one longs for the days gone by, when film makers made just one good product and had sufficient confidence in their ability to leave it to the intelligence of audiences of all ages to like it or lump it.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century (in the sense 'look sulky'): symbolic of displeasure; compare with words such as dump and grump. The current sense dates from the early 19th century.

More
  • lumber from (Late Middle English):

    The earliest lumber in English meant ‘to move in a slow, heavy, awkward way’. Its origin is not known, but its form may have been intended to suggest clumsiness or heaviness, rather like lump (Middle English). This may have been the origin of lumber in the sense ‘disused furniture and articles that take up space’, but people also associated the term with the old word lumber meaning ‘a pawnbroker's shop’, which was an alteration of Lombard or ‘person from Lombardy’. The mainly North American sense ‘timber sawn into rough planks’ appears to be a development of the ‘disused furniture’ meaning, as is the verb to be lumbered or burdened with something unwanted. The slang phrase in lumber, ‘in trouble’, originally meant ‘in pawn, pawned’.

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