Definition of macerate in English:

macerate

Syllabification: mac·er·ate
Pronunciation: /ˈmasəˌrāt
 
/

verb

1(Especially with reference to food) soften or become softened by soaking in a liquid.
More example sentences
  • Leaves from adults were macerated with liquid nitrogen and then 75 mg of the tissue was mixed with 375 ml of extraction buffer.
  • Identifying the prey of the giant squid, Achiteuthis dux, is not easy since they finely macerate their food.
  • Infusing, distilling, macerating, deglazing and reducing - all, in one way or another, contribute to the essence of a final product.
2 archaic Cause to grow thinner or waste away, especially by fasting.
More example sentences
  • She already macerated her poor little body and had resolved never to refuse the requests of the unfortunate.
  • Cancer macerated her body and soul.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin macerat- 'made soft, soaked', from the verb macerare.

Derivatives

maceration

Pronunciation: /ˌmasəˈrāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • The Burgundian vogue for cold maceration occasionally calls for refrigeration too.
  • These holes appear to represent tubercles that did not become phosphatized and were dissolved during maceration.
  • Profuse sweating can result in skin maceration and secondary microbial infections.

macerator

Pronunciation: /-ˌrātər/
noun
More example sentences
  • ‘The food macerator recycles liquid as a sort of soup, to avoid the need for fresh water,’ said Sarah.
  • The toilet is flushed and the effluent is discharged by gravity through the rear spigot and into the macerator device.
  • Food Waste is washed through the sink into the Macerator, which then can be discharged to sea.

Definition of macerate in:

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