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manticore

Syllabification: man·ti·core
Pronunciation: /ˈman(t)iˌkôr
 
/

Definition of manticore in English:

noun

A mythical beast typically depicted as having the body of a lion, the face of a man, and the sting of a scorpion.
Example sentences
  • Historically, too, medieval mapmakers and geographers filled unknown regions with such beasties: centaurs, mermaids, manticores and Tartary lambs.
  • One had skulls - apparently from mythical beasts such as unicorns, manticores, and other creatures; while another stand had large wooden pipes, each one trembling slightly.
  • Perhaps it's the Unicorn's very ability to resist such temptation, that's kept our numbers down, but like the manticore and the chimera I have great reasons to suspect the propriety of some of my ancestors.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, via Latin from Greek mantikhōras, corrupt reading in Aristotle for martikhoras, from an Old Persian word meaning 'man-eater'.

Words that rhyme with manticore

ichorencore

Definition of manticore in:

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