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maze

Syllabification: maze
Pronunciation: /māz
 
/

Definition of maze in English:

noun

1A network of paths and hedges designed as a puzzle through which one has to find a way.
Example sentences
  • When the rats were put in mazes designed to test learning and memory, those that had been anaesthetised performed worse than those that had not been given the drugs.
  • They turn a corner of the hedge maze and find the statue of Theo's bride.
  • The maze will be at the farm until the plants wither away in October when the field will be cut, ready for a new maze with a new design next year.
1.1A complex network of paths or passages: they were trapped in a menacing maze of corridors
More example sentences
  • Three hundred people lived in the maze of complex interwoven passages for six years during the American war.
  • I walked through the maze of passages, taking whichever bearing I felt pulled towards.
  • Amidst these, through a complex maze of natural stone bridges and walkways, was a smaller peak.
Synonyms
labyrinth, complex network, warren;
web, tangle, jungle, snarl;
puzzle
1.2A confusing mass of information: a maze of petty regulations
More example sentences
  • The Museum's imaginative mix of social history and artefacts provides a maze of information.
  • In such a situation, an ordinary individual finds himself in a maze of perplexing notions and ideas.
  • To pretty much anyone this lot represents a bewildering, tangled, confused maze of information.

verb

(be mazed) archaic or dialect Back to top  
Be dazed and confused: she was still mazed with the drug she had taken
More example sentences
  • Beyond this garden, abrupt, there was a grey stone wall overgrown with velvet moss that uprose as, gazing, Matthew stood long, all mazed and blinking, to see this place so eerie and fair.
  • He was regarded with suspicion, considered an outsider and a very strange young man, being called ‘funny’ or even ‘mazed’ by the locals.

Origin

Middle English (denoting delirium or delusion): probably from the base of amaze, of which the verb is a shortening.

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