Definition of metaphor in English:

metaphor

Syllabification: met·a·phor
Pronunciation: /ˈmedəˌfôr
 
, ˈmedəˌfər
 
/

noun

1A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable: “I had fallen through a trapdoor of depression,” said Mark, who was fond of theatrical metaphors her poetry depends on suggestion and metaphor
More example sentences
  • Images are often presented through figures of speech like simile and metaphor.
  • It is his method of organising words, images and metaphors to create the particular effect he seeks to achieve.
  • Her daily speech is sprinkled with metaphors and witty turns of phrase.
Synonyms
figure of speech, image, trope, analogy, comparison, symbol, word painting/picture
1.1A thing regarded as representative or symbolic of something else, especially something abstract: the amounts of money being lost by the company were enough to make it a metaphor for an industry that was teetering
More example sentences
  • The torso also includes the heart, a metaphor for your vital life force, as well as representing the bonds of love.
  • I had also meant for this story to be a metaphor for my own life as I knew it and saw it.
  • In the story, this inability to finish a picture is a metaphor for being reluctant to commit to a relationship.

Origin

late 15th century: from French métaphore, via Latin from Greek metaphora, from metapherein 'to transfer'.

Derivatives

metaphoric

Pronunciation: /ˌmetəˈfôrik/
adjective
More example sentences
  • The manipulated photographs are totally seamless and their metaphoric power is matched only by their technical expertise.
  • This sort of stuff floats my boat, to be metaphoric.
  • The metaphoric play of visual codes continually shifts from the record of barricades to the formal signage of lines within frames.

Definition of metaphor in:

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected