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minuet

Syllabification: min·u·et
Pronunciation: /ˌminyəˈwet
 
/

Definition of minuet in English:

noun

1A slow, stately ballroom dance for two in triple time, popular especially in the 18th century.
Example sentences
  • Under the direction of instructor Shirley Agate-Proust from the Alberta Ballet School of Dance, a group of dancers in period costumes will recreate baroque dances including a minuet and a gavotte.
  • He also celebrates the minuet, of all dances the one that most clearly captures the blend of pastoral elegance and amorous desire that becomes synonymous with the ballet itself.
  • Louie, who dances a shaky minuet if properly guided, seemed like a shoo-in.
1.1A piece of music in triple time in the style of a minuet, typically as a movement in a suite, sonata, or symphony and frequently coupled with a trio.
Example sentences
  • From Beethoven onwards the traditional place of the minuet in symphonies and chamber music began to be taken over by the scherzo.
  • Touches are varied, legato, staccato - at times both used together in separate hands, and forms include simple sonata form, minuet, rondo, and theme and variations.
  • The minuet character of the music, and the polka quotations, are displayed by the alternating, more static, poses of individual female dancers, with a pas de deux of male and female to provide a more rustic appearance.

verb (minuets, minueting, minueted)

[no object] Back to top  
Dance a minuet.
Example sentences
  • They marched, minueted, clambered and flipped up and down backs, and skipped with their partners folk- dance style.
  • The play's prologue, in yet another fully stretched example, is delivered in contemporary attire, before the cast minueting in period costumes.

Origin

late 17th century: from French menuet, 'fine, delicate', diminutive (used as a noun) of menu 'small'.

More
  • menu from (mid 19th century):

    When people first used menu in English they treated it as a foreign word, printing it in italic type, and perhaps pronouncing it in a ‘French’ way. The word means ‘detailed list’ in French, and is a use of menu ‘small, detailed’ from Latin minutus ‘small’, the source of minute, mince, minutiae (mid 18th century) ‘small, precise or trivial details’, the delicate dance the minuet (late 17th century), and diminish. Applied to a list of dishes available in a restaurant, it dates from the mid 19th century; by the 20th it was fully anglicized, and by the 1960s could also mean ‘a list of facilities or commands displayed on a computer screen’.

Definition of minuet in:

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Word of the day terpsichorean
Pronunciation: ˌtəːpsɪkəˈriːən
adjective
relating to dancing