Definition of mnemonic in English:

mnemonic

Syllabification: mne·mon·ic
Pronunciation: /nəˈmänik
 
/

noun

  • A device such as a pattern of letters, ideas, or associations that assists in remembering something.
    More example sentences
    • Short, succinct, and easy to remember - a mnemonic.
    • When performing under divided attention at retrieval, an elaborate mnemonic may be produced at encoding and only partially accessed during retrieval.
    • Because we sometimes learn and remember best through the use of mnemonics I have created the following mental touchstones.

adjective

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  • 1Aiding or designed to aid the memory.
    More example sentences
    • When adjusted for differences in overall mnemonic ability, we demonstrate that the relationship between organization and learning remains invariant with normal aging.
    • To me, this isn't the occasional mnemonic hiccup, it's a cognitive hacking cough.
    • This is so because their differences in mnemonic ability put them on a different scale.
  • 1.1Of or relating to the power of memory.
    More example sentences
    • Her poems often have a hip-hop feel, emphasizing repetition and the mnemonic power of the spoken word.
    • The mnemonic power of poetry - the rhythmic organization of words as an aid to memory - however, is central, if not indispensable, to the transmission of a tradition in an oral society.
    • The second is that the mnemonic power of a life-size naturalistic effigy vivifies the presence of the dead during the second-burial ceremony, enabling mourners to treat the image as if it were alive.

Derivatives

mnemonically

Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • One is the dual coding hypothesis that imaginal and verbal codes are mnemonically independent and, therefore, additive in their effects on item memory.
  • The author offers one particularly intriguing example of how this sort of mnemonically based representation could include activities that modern scholars would describe as portrait making.
  • Yes, that spells CAMP for you mnemonically disposed readers.

Origin

mid 18th century (as an adjective): via medieval Latin from Greek mnēmonikos, from mnēmōn 'mindful'.

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