Definition of moderato in English:

moderato

Syllabification: mod·e·ra·to
Pronunciation: /ˌmädəˈrädō
 
/
Music

adverb & adjective

(Especially as a direction after a tempo marking) at a moderate pace: allegro moderato
More example sentences
  • In other words, the mood that is written above the score is never quite identical to the affects it contains: Moderato Cantabile is never quite moderato cantabile.
  • The penultimate, Prelude 23, is faster than the moderato marking.
  • As this passage also suggests, however, moderato cantabile seems to be much more than what is written above the score.

noun (plural moderatos)

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A passage marked to be performed at a moderate pace.
More example sentences
  • The moderato comes with such tastefully conceived phrasing and smooth quality that there is now the kind of near-perfection that gives an idea of what these two musicians are capable of together.
  • The work falls into four movements - moderato, slow, scherzo, and allegro finale - the last three played without a break.
  • A mysterious first movement, prelude: adagio - moderato, runs much of its course over a rocking two-note pattern, building to a powerful climax.

Origin

Italian, literally 'moderate'.

Definition of moderato in:

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