Definition of moth in English:

moth

Syllabification: moth
Pronunciation: /môTH
 
/

noun (plural moths /môT͟Hz, môTHs/)

1A chiefly nocturnal insect related to the butterflies. It lacks the clubbed antennae of butterflies and typically has a stout body, drab coloration, and wings that fold flat when resting.
  • Most superfamilies of the order Lepidoptera. Formerly placed in a grouping known as the Heterocera
More example sentences
  • Bats and nocturnal moths take to the wing, while butterflies settle and flowers begin to close their petals.
  • This is a bacterium that is only harmful to Lepidoptera - butterflies and moths.
  • Butterflies, moths, hummingbirds, cardinals, bluejays and more visited our gardens.
1.1 informal short for clothes moth.
More example sentences
  • These are the herbs that were used in medieval times to deter moths and fleas from clothing and people.
  • Damage from moths, mildew or vermin is also not covered, so if the rats eat your clothes, tough luck Charlie.

Origin

Old English moththe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch mot and German Motte.

Phrases

like a moth to the flame

With an irresistible attraction for someone or something: wealthy amateurs who have been attracted like moths to the glittering flames of showbiz
More example sentences
  • He argued that as the British and Irish governments were transfixed by the peace process like a moth to the flame, the Sinn Fein leadership, playing by its own rules, benefited from the permanent instability.
  • But (and here is the contradiction) simply by hating it, I am drawn to it like a moth to the flame.
  • She felt like a moth to the flame, knowing that the more time she spent with him, the more battered her world would become.

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