Definition of much in English:

much

Syllabification: much
Pronunciation: /məCH
 
/

determiner & pronoun (more, most)

[often with negative or in questions]
1A large amount: [as determiner]: I did not get much sleep I did so much shopping [as pronoun]: he does not eat much they must bear much of the blame
More example sentences
  • So much of modern medicine relies on our understanding of the physiology of the human body.
  • I am a little afraid to ask what it is, but I do know I will not be eating much of this.
  • He is thought to have spent much of the previous night at a North Yorkshire guest house.
Synonyms
a lot of, a great/good deal of, a great/large amount of, plenty of, ample, copious, abundant, plentiful, considerable
informal lots of, loads of, heaps of, masses of, tons of, piles of, mucho
a lot, a great/good deal, plenty
informal lots, loads, heaps, masses
1.1 [as pronoun with negative] Used to refer disparagingly to someone or something as being a poor specimen: I’m not much of a gardener
More example sentences
  • The idea wasn't at all simple and so I didn't have much of a chance to run with it.
  • In an escalating situation neither side has much of a reputation for brinkmanship.
  • Great person, and a huge influence, but didn't have that much of an effect on the album.

adverb

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1To a great extent; a great deal: did it hurt much? thanks very much they did not mind, much to my surprise [with comparative]: they look much better [with superlative]: Nicolai’s English was much the worst
More example sentences
  • It is a gesture that is very much appreciated by myself and Dawn's family in Devon.
  • Their innovative power and tremendous humour and charm are still very much intact.
  • McEwan has always had a twinkle in her eyes and this is going to be very much evident with the new series.
Synonyms
greatly, to a great extent/degree, a great deal, a lot, considerably, appreciably
1.1 [usually with negative or in questions] For a large part of one’s time; often: I’m not there much
More example sentences
  • I don't go out much anymore, so a Guide Dog would be wasted on me.
  • He is kind of an egocentric person and I guess if he doesn't read much, he doesn't think anyone does either.
  • We don't watch tv much, but we spend all of our time on the Internet.
Synonyms
often, frequently, many times, repeatedly, regularly, habitually, routinely, usually, normally, commonly
informal a lot

Origin

Middle English: shortened from muchel, from Old English micel (see mickle).

Phrases

as much

The same: I am sure she would do as much for me
More example sentences
  • Those of us who have to travel on the Northern line have suspected as much for years.
  • I figured as much: I had a feeling this was the case.
  • I hoped as much, thanks for confirming that.

a bit much

informal Somewhat excessive or unreasonable: his earnestness can be a bit much
More example sentences
  • Yes, all this red wine as emblem and object of worship may get a bit much, of course.
  • I will go out for him for the sake of research but really 3 calls in 2 days is a bit much since we haven't even had a date yet!
  • The picture above with all the limousines is maybe a bit much, but hey, that's just the kind of place it is.

make much of

Give or ascribe a significant amount of attention or importance to: the island can make much of its history as a trading post between Europe and the Arab world
More example sentences
  • That is what he pushed hardest in the campaign, but it's an issue he never made much of until then.
  • In discussing the song ‘Watching the River Flow’, he makes much of what he calls the ‘choppy’ arrangement and how it works against the lyric.
  • Mr. Weigel makes much of what he sees as atheistic humanism in Europe, and he calls for a revitalization of Europe's Christian roots.

(as) much as

Even though: much as I had enjoyed my adventure, it was good to be back
More example sentences
  • As much as he enjoyed his career, it paled into insignificance beside the love he felt for his family.
  • But much as Murray is revelling in his new status as a tournament champion, he is not daft.
  • As much as I know that we need to take the rough with the smooth, I think some smooth would be very nice right about now.

much less

see less.

so much the better (or worse)

That is even better (or worse): we want to hear what you have to say, but if you can make it short, so much the better
More example sentences
  • If you have more, so much the better - we're a little short up here.
  • What then followed was a bundle of falsehoods and bizarre inversions of reality, perhaps retailed in good faith (and so much the worse if they were).
  • If the celebrations could be associated with a greater awareness of the country's culture, history and traditions, so much the better.

this much

The fact about to be stated: I know this much, you would defy the world to get what you wanted
More example sentences
  • But you accept this much at any rate: you did in fact stab her twice?
  • Details of exactly what happened next are murky, but this much is clear.
  • I'll tell you this much, any guy who pulls a stunt like that is coming away with a bloody stump.

too much

An intolerable, impossible, or exhausting situation or experience: the effort proved too much for her
More example sentences
  • Their outstanding quality was a little bit too much for us and it was a fair result.
  • It is too much for us lesser mortals to understand fully what we are supporting and why.
  • Is it too much to ask to have a little drama surrounding my entrance into the world?

Derivatives

muchly

adverb
( humorous )
More example sentences
  • I'll make a few bucks off the sale of each book, which will help out muchly when I join the ranks of the unemployed in mid-December.
  • I have Womens Studies and am looking forward to it muchly… that is, if class isn't cancelled tonight.
  • I remember thinking that violins would smell of a forest in summer, and was muchly disappointed when it smelt metallic and oily.

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Word of the day conspicuous
Pronunciation: kənˈspɪkjʊəs
adjective
clearly visible