Definition of mundane in English:

mundane

Syllabification: mun·dane
Pronunciation: /ˌmənˈdān
 
/

adjective

1Lacking interest or excitement; dull: seeking a way out of his mundane, humdrum existence
More example sentences
  • The next day was as boring, mundane, unexciting, humdrum, dull, tedious, uneventful and monotonous as usual.
  • Those acronyms, some might say, are designed to add a hint of excitement to an otherwise mundane and dull industry.
  • We put fancy, bubbly skins on the dull and mundane and think that we're making it all more interesting.
Synonyms
humdrum, dull, boring, tedious, monotonous, tiresome, wearisome, unexciting, uninteresting, uninvolving, uneventful, unvarying, unremarkable, repetitive, repetitious, routine, ordinary, everyday, day-to-day, run-of-the-mill, commonplace, workaday
informal plain-vanilla, ho-hum
2Of this earthly world rather than a heavenly or spiritual one: the boundaries of the mundane world
More example sentences
  • The book's grand aims are filtered through his muddled mind, which has the unfortunate effect of making his spiritual quest seem mundane.
  • The diary juxtaposes the profound and the mundane, rather like life itself.
  • In relating to the activities in life, whether spiritual or mundane, their sense of workability disappears, and they face a state of bleakness.
Synonyms
2.1Of, relating to, or denoting the branch of astrology that deals with political, social, economic, and geophysical events and processes.
More example sentences
  • The second is mundane astrology, concerning the rise and fall of kingdoms, battles, revolutions, etc.
  • Its influence was always dreaded in mundane astrology, being unfavorable to the farmer's work.
  • Every indication is negative for peace as far as mundane astrology is concerned.

Origin

late Middle English (sense 2): from Old French mondain, from late Latin mundanus, from Latin mundus 'world'. sense 1 dates from the late 19th century.

Derivatives

mundanely

adverb
More example sentences
  • More mundanely, not all those who would ‘pass’ have access to the same level of resources or conversely, the same capacity to deflect scrutiny.
  • There was a great deal of variation, ranging from the mundanely technical to the anguished plea for understanding and cooperation.
  • More mundanely, they're cooks, cleaners, drivers, a pair of willing hands and the biggest fan their child will ever have.

mundaneness

noun
More example sentences
  • The tinsel town rolled out the red carpet, promising not just money and fame, but an opportunity to break free from mundaneness that defines the middle class.
  • The whole idea of a ‘soap opera’ suggests an overt incongruity between the daily mundaneness of the narrative and the lofty form it takes.
  • For, as the producer states: ‘You see why people are attracted to each other, why people fall in love, why people fall out of love, why you get sucked into the mundaneness of a relationship after a long time.’

mundanity

Pronunciation: /-ˈdānətē/
noun (plural mundanities)
More example sentences
  • For some people, alcohol appears to be a form of escapism from the mundanity of everyday life or a way of allowing themselves to relax in company (with our anti-social/unsocialised nature that's no surprise).
  • Seeking a publisher in the 1950s, Gorey met with a lot of rejection, editors seemingly unable to find humour in his gothic tales of disturbed and disrupted mundanity, his drawings of gnarled creatures lurking in moonlit landscapes.
  • And I love the fun of being able to dream out loud, and to create worlds into which your readers can escape from mundanity, refresh themselves, and maybe bring back with them to the ‘real’ world.

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