There are 3 definitions of mush in English:

mush1

Syllabification: mush
Pronunciation: /məSH
 
/

noun

1A soft, wet, pulpy mass: red lentils cook quickly and soon turn to mush
More example sentences
  • The chips were fine, but the deep-fried tube of pink mush was not an experience to be quickly repeated.
  • I snapped the hard outer crust and observed a softer kernel consisting of unidentifiable mush with what looked like carrots and bean skins protruding from it.
  • The last of the summer's flowers are mush, all the leaves have fallen off the maple and my chrysanthemums are looking a sorry sight.
Synonyms
pap, pulp, slop, paste, puree, mash, porridge
informal gloop, goo, gook, glop, sludge, guck
1.1North American Thick porridge, especially made of cornmeal.
More example sentences
  • Maize is used to produce various sorts of porridge or cornmeal mush.
  • He scooped up the sloppy bowl of thick mush that was mindlessly held out to him as he strode into the barracks.
  • If you like polenta - that creamy, golden, northern Italian mush - then you have a choice of slow or fast polenta.
2Feeble or cloying sentimentality: the film’s not just romantic mush
More example sentences
  • And more importantly, he avoids turning all this into sentimental mush.
  • The cards, covered in pastel colors and sentimental mush, were of the lovey-dovey variety.
  • It's a sticky situation, alright: how do you make a funny, feel-good holiday movie that doesn't fall into the trap of turning into sentimental mush as soon as things start to get good?
Synonyms

verb

[with object] (usually as adjective mushed) Back to top  
Reduce (a substance) to a soft, wet, pulpy mass: simmer until the apples and potatoes are tender but not mushed
More example sentences
  • William took his tray and shoved her, mushing the pizza into her shirt.
  • Well do you have noodles slowly being mushed between the keys of your keyboard as you type?
  • I picked up a handful of snow from what was left on the bench and mushed it around in my hand idly.

Origin

late 17th century (sense 2 of the noun): apparently a variant of mash.

Definition of mush in:

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Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: ɪˈpɪlɪən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 3 definitions of mush in English:

mush2

Syllabification: mush
Pronunciation: /məSH
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Go on a journey across snow with a dogsled: by the end of winter he will have snowshoed up to 700 miles and mushed about the same
More example sentences
  • The Iditarod consists of well-worn and easy-to-follow trails that local residents use throughout the year, mushing and snowmobiling from village to village.
  • My goal this year was to finish with a healthy team and to have fun, (although one's idea of fun can be debatable when mushing and camping at - 50oC!).
  • ‘That's kind of hot for mushing,’ he said, explaining that they will feed the dogs flavored ice chips to keep them cool.
1.1 [with object] Urge on (the dogs) during a journey across snow with a dogsled.
More example sentences
  • It's certainly great fun spending days mushing your own dog team.
  • The following month, she learned to mush dogs, and fell in love with the practice.
  • Even when mushing a husky dog sleigh team through the frozen deserts of Iceland she is inappropriately dressed in a thin body-hugging woollen outfit.

exclamation

Back to top  
A command urging on dogs pulling a sled during a journey across snow.

noun

Back to top  
A journey across snow with a dogsled: a twelve-day mush
More example sentences
  • Some families play Monopoly, others watch TV - but one 17 year old and her family mush together.

Origin

mid 19th century: probably an alteration of French marchez! or marchons!, imperatives of marcher 'to advance'.

Definition of mush in:

There are 3 definitions of mush in English:

mush3

Line breaks: mush

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

British informal
1A person’s mouth or face.
2Used as a form of address: what you doing round here, mush?

Origin

mid 19th century: probably from Romany, 'man'.

Definition of mush in: