There are 4 definitions of nap in English:

nap1

Syllabification: nap

verb (naps, napping, napped)

[no object]
Sleep lightly or briefly, especially during the day.
More example sentences
  • I wondered if I had been glued to the bed, I could barely will myself to move, and then finally able to lift a limb or two, I turned over and felt into a sound sleep, napping for an hour.
  • I have no idea what I'm thinking or feeling about this, but I must be nervous, since I was up all night, and just napped very briefly today.
  • For many months he wouldn't settle, slept fitfully, never napped and as a result was tired, irritable and tiring.
Synonyms
doze, sleep, sleep lightly, take a nap, catnap, rest, take a siesta
informal snooze, catch forty winks, get some shut-eye, catch some Zs, catch a few Zs

noun

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A short sleep, especially during the day: excuse me, I’ll just take a little nap
More example sentences
  • And then we all had a nice long afternoon nap.
  • He took a short nap in the afternoon and that was all.
  • I'll just take a nice long nap and you can wake me up in 2 hours.
Synonyms
(some) sleep, a little sleep, a catnap, a siesta, a doze, a lie-down, (a/some) rest, a little rest
informal a snooze, forty winks, (some) shut-eye, a little shut-eye, (some) beauty sleep/rest, a little beauty sleep/rest, a power nap

Origin

Old English hnappian, probably of Germanic origin.

Phrases

catch someone napping

informal (Of a person, action, or event) find someone off guard and unprepared to respond: he caught the runner napping off second base and tagged him out
More example sentences
  • Several times throughout the first half, they were caught napping as the ball was played over, through and round them.
  • From the restart, Windermere were caught napping, however, when poor tackling let Workington drive up the centre of the park.
  • Eventually, Manchester took a 2-1 lead before half time with an opportunist goal when a quickly-take free hit just inside the 22 caught Kendal napping for a second time.
Synonyms
catch off guard, catch unawares, surprise, take by surprise, catch out, find unprepared

Definition of nap in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 4 definitions of nap in English:

nap2

Syllabification: nap

noun

[in singular]
The raised hairs, threads, or similar small projections on the surface of fabric or suede (used especially with reference to the direction in which they naturally lie): carefully machine the seam, following the direction of the nap
More example sentences
  • Flannelette is a soft cotton fabric with a nap on one side.
  • Stitch all seams in the direction of the nap with right sides together.
  • Flannel wool is a soft, lightweight fabric with a nap on one or both sides.
Synonyms
pile, fibers, threads, weave, surface, grain

Origin

late Middle English noppe, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German noppe 'nap', noppen 'trim the nap from'.

Derivatives

napless

adjective
More example sentences
  • We stay in a cheap hotel that has hard, napless, gummy carpeting, like the stuff you sometimes find in the vicinity of indoor swimming pools.
  • Also, the lateral napless edges along a fabric web have also been scanned by means of mechanical sensors.
  • Note that nap and napless carpets played a crucial role in everyday life of Azerbaijanians.

Definition of nap in:

There are 4 definitions of nap in English:

nap3

Syllabification: nap

noun

A card game resembling whist in which players declare the number of tricks they expect to take, up to five.

Origin

early 19th century: abbreviation of napoleon, the original name of the card game.

Definition of nap in:

There are 4 definitions of nap in English:

nap4

Syllabification: nap

verb (naps, napping, napped)

[no object]
(Of a horse) refuse, especially habitually, to go on at the rider’s instruction; jib.
More example sentences
  • Vices, if they occur, like napping, can quickly be overcome, with no fear of getting the bit pulled through the mouth.
  • She will be showing people how to deal with issues like jumping, biting, rearing and napping by ‘listening’ to their horse.
  • At the first fence, he naps and runs out, and I hit him, and he bucked me off and was running around this field with me and the owners chasing after him.

Origin

1950s: back-formation from nappy, an adjective first used to describe heady beer ( late Middle English), later used in the sense 'intoxicated by drink' (early 18th century), and since the 1920s used to describe a disobedient horse.

Definition of nap in: