Definition of nauseate in English:

nauseate

Syllabification: nau·se·ate
Pronunciation: /ˈnôzēˌāt, - ZHēˌāt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Make (someone) feel sick; affect with nausea: the thought of food nauseated her
More example sentences
  • We had headaches from the smell, and I was so nauseated the last night that I couldn't even eat my dinner.
  • It doesn't hurt but you feel nauseated the week after so that even cranberry juice makes you feel sick because it's the same colour as the medication.
  • I wanted to get up and go for a run, but I had a faint headache that was nonetheless making me feel fairly queasy and nauseated.
1.1Fill (someone) with revulsion; disgust: I was nauseated by the vicious comment
More example sentences
  • It nauseates me to see people running after magic pills, worthless dietary supplements, and fad diets.
  • Should we be nauseated by people of the older generation expressing their affection?
  • Little kids will enjoy the pretty pictures and chortle over the cute Terk - actually a pretty nauseating character.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin nauseat- 'made to feel sick', from the verb nauseare, from nausea (see nausea).

Usage

A distinction has traditionally been drawn between nauseated, meaning ‘affected with nausea,’ and nauseous, meaning ‘causing nausea.’ Today, however, the use of nauseous to mean ‘affected with nausea’ is so common that it is generally considered to be standard.

Definition of nauseate in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily