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nepotism

Syllabification: nep·o·tism
Pronunciation: /ˈnepəˌtizəm
 
/

Definition of nepotism in English:

noun

The practice among those with power or influence of favoring relatives or friends, especially by giving them jobs.
Example sentences
  • Reregistration is necessary to avoid corruption, collusion or nepotism among civil servants.
  • Those at the top indulged in nepotism, power politics and failed to give the Church a lead.
  • Such nepotism is common among post-Soviet central Asian leaders.
Synonyms
favoritism, preferential treatment, the old boy network, looking after one's own, bias, partiality, partisanship

Origin

mid 17th century: from French népotisme, from Italian nepotismo, from nipote 'nephew' (with reference to privileges bestowed on the “nephews” of popes, who were in many cases their illegitimate sons).

Derivatives

nepotist

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Unfortunately in 2002 this part of the UDF, which I call the nepotists, had a significant role in electing the party leadership and obtained very significant positions in the UDF.
  • Yes, Alawis were over-represented in his institutions, but he was far less of an incestuous Alawi nepotist than he has been painted as being.
  • At least the nepotist is grasping for someone else: the children.

nepotistic

2
Pronunciation: /ˌnepəˈtistik/
adjective
Example sentences
  • And one of the key indicators is that the public service who serve the government and serve the citizens are corrupt or nepotistic and can't be trusted, and of course what that does is to undermine democracy.
  • Like so many, I am beyond fed up with an inert, intellectually lazy, nepotistic ALP that refuses to grasp the dangerous long term implications of the current government.
  • The truth is that, despite the best efforts of a Labour oligarchy, our parliament and Executive are no more corrupt or inefficient or nepotistic than those in any other small country, probably less so than most.

Definition of nepotism in:

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