Definition of noose in English:

noose

Syllabification: noose
Pronunciation: /no͞os
 
/

noun

1A loop with a running knot, tightening as the rope or wire is pulled and typically used to hang people or trap animals.
More example sentences
  • Its gnarled branches twisted and turned into the air, and a hangman's noose hung from one of its thickest and strongest branches.
  • But hanging from a beam in the center of a room typically reserved for celebrations and weddings is a crude, handmade noose fashioned out of three electrical wires.
  • Members of the study population were captured by placing a soft elastic noose around the perimeter of an active burrow entrance.
1.1 (the noose) Death by hanging.
More example sentences
  • My dreams for the future have now atrophied to simply ‘keeping the noose at bay.’
  • Yet he is one of the three still facing the noose.
  • One might have expected criminals awaiting trial to have been especially defensive, doing their best to avoid the noose by shifting blame elsewhere.
1.2 (the noose) A difficult situation regarded as a restraint or bond: the West is exploring ways to tighten the economic noose

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Put a noose on (someone): she was noosed and hooded, then strangled by the executioner
More example sentences
  • The novitiate, blindfolded and noosed, was brought before them and a gun fired into the air.
  • When the hangman came to noose her she knocked him clean out of the cart.
1.1Catch (an animal) with a noose.
More example sentences
  • Pitfall traps were placed opportunistically next to logs to supplement noosing and remained there for the entire study.
  • Individuals were noosed, measured, weighed, and marked with synthetic paint to ease observation.
1.2Form (a rope) into a noose.
More example sentences
  • A silver-blue rope of sorts was noosed around the creature's throat.
  • Six boys found her body with a black chiffon scarf noosed around her neck.

Origin

late Middle English: probably via Old French no(u)s from Latin nodus 'knot'.

Phrases

put one's head in a noose

Bring about one’s own downfall.
More example sentences
  • This was the awakening, the realization that I had officially and for all time put my head in a noose and the hangman was taking his sweet time.

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