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novice

Syllabification: nov·ice
Pronunciation: /ˈnävəs
 
/

Definition of novice in English:

noun

1A person new to or inexperienced in a field or situation: he was a complete novice in foreign affairs
More example sentences
  • The system used is not particularly user friendly for novices or inexperienced staff: this could be improved with more modern software facilities.
  • While the LSO no longer directs the pilot down, he is constantly giving advice if required and can be a calming voice for the inexperienced novice.
  • This annual sporting event takes place on Sunday, May 1 when keen runners and complete novices get together for a five-mile race, a one-mile adult run and a one-mile children's event.
Synonyms
1.1A person who has entered a religious order and is under probation, before taking vows.
Example sentences
  • A friend who is a novice in an Episcopal religious order recently told me that she has no taste now for books of contemporary spirituality.
  • He joined the monastic order as a novice, and studied the Hua-yen ching with Chih-yen.
  • Galileo had a mixed education, starting at a monastery school in Vallombrosa where he entered the order as a novice, against the wishes of his father.
Synonyms
postulant, proselyte, catechumen
1.2An animal, especially a racehorse, that has not yet won a major prize or reached a level of performance to qualify for important events.
Example sentences
  • It was only fitting that there should be a female winner on Ladies Day and trainer Venetia Williams obliged when Limerick Boy won the novices' hurdle handicap.
  • And there was some consolation for the connections of Limestone Lad when Solerina won the novice hurdle.
  • Captain Christy, ridden by Bobby Beasley, remains the last novice to have won chasing's blue riband event.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from late Latin novicius, from novus 'new'.

More
  • new from (Old English):

    New comes from the same root as Latin novus, the source of the English words innovate (mid 16th century), novel, novice (Middle English), and renovate (early 16th century). The noun news (Late Middle English) is simply the plural of new. It came into use as a translation of Old French noveles or medieval Latin nova, meaning ‘new things’. The proverb no news is good news, although modern-sounding, can be traced back at least as far as the time of King James I, who wrote in 1616 that ‘No newis is bettir then evill newis’. It may be based on the Italian phrase Nulla nuova, buona nova (‘No news, good news’). Newfangled (Middle English) is from new and a second element related to an Old English word meaning ‘to take’.

Words that rhyme with novice

Leavis • Divis • Clovis

Definition of novice in:

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
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