There are 3 definitions of Orange in English:

Orange1

Syllabification: Or·ange
Pronunciation: /ôˈräNZH, ˈär-
 
/
  • 1A town in southern France, on the Rhône River, home of the ancestors of the Dutch royal house. See Orange, House of.
  • 2A city in southwestern California, southeast of Los Angeles in an agricultural area; population 136,392 (est. 2008).

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 3 definitions of Orange in English:

Orange2

Line breaks: Or¦ange
Pronunciation: /ˈɒrɪn(d)ʒ/

Entry from British & World English dictionary

adjective

  • Relating to the Orange Order: Orange marches

Derivatives

Orangeism

noun

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There are 3 definitions of Orange in English:

orange

Syllabification: or·ange
Pronunciation: /ˈôrənj, ˈär-
 
/

noun

  • 1A round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.
    More example sentences
    • Slice each orange into 5mm rounds, trying to reserve as much juice as you can.
    • There was a tree toward the front, its branches laden with big, bright oranges.
    • When an orange is juiced, fibre and other health-giving elements are left behind.
  • 1.1A drink made from or flavored with orange: a vodka and orange
    More example sentences
    • The student's friends thought it was likely that her drink, a vodka and orange, had been spiked either as she was at the bar or as she was walking across the dance floor, as it was a large, open glass.
    • Dyer is putting on an exhibition of running around, sort of like a mini-Pete Sampras lookalike who's drunk too much fizzy orange.
    • Martin found he liked the strange new drink, but Jack wisely made his next drink orange and lemonade.
  • 2 (also orange tree) The leathery-leaved evergreen tree that bears the orange, native to warm regions of south and Southeast Asia. Oranges are a major commercial crop in many warm regions of the world.
    • Genus Citrus, family Rutaceae: several species, in particular the sweet orange (C. sinensis) and the Seville orange
    More example sentences
    • Zhaar or orange flower water is an extract of the Bergamot orange tree.
    • Her romantic garden showcases David Austin roses, hydrangeas, camellias, orange trees and numerous perennial and annual plants.
    • They came to a connected room, full of oranges and palm trees.
  • 2.1Used in names of other plants with fruit or flowers similar to the orange, e.g., mock orange.
  • 3A bright reddish-yellow color like that of the skin of a ripe orange.
    More example sentences
    • We mean really bright colours like orange, yellow, red, and green.
    • For those wanting something more bright, there are colours like orange, green, and lemon.
    • ‘We are the only school in the country that has orange as its primary colour,’ director of athletics Jake Crouthamel outlined.

adjective

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  • 1Reddish yellow, like a ripe orange in color: an orange glow in the sky
    More example sentences
    • Its creamy yellow to deep orange flowers glow like sunshine even on the darkest day until the frost finally kills them at the end of the year.
    • The city was gorgeous during the fall, the yellow and orange leaves really giving the streets a special glow.
    • Yellow or orange flame means one is wasting gas.

Derivatives

orangey

(also orangy) adjective
More example sentences
  • In Mary Dolman's two works, the orangy red fox lopes through a snowy scene with the sky above repeating the colour of the fox.
  • Mars becomes a lot more orangy, but I can't make out any particular shape, not without a tripod or something, anyway.
  • ‘For lips, there is a shift towards orangey reds or corals,’ says Molloy.

orangish

(also orangeish) adjective
More example sentences
  • By this time, the furniture is all covered with a light film of orangish dirt, the windows are grimy, and the garden, driveway and trees all look like they have recently emerged from a sea of dust.
  • Most of the nodules, when cut with a diamond saw, were translucent to opaque and whitish-gray, but some had a reddish to orangish tint.
  • It occurs as dark brown, red-brown, yellow-brown, orangish, and amber crystals.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French orenge (in the phrase pomme d'orenge), based on Arabic nāranj, from Persian nārang.

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