Definition of orient in English:

orient

Syllabification: o·ri·ent
Pronunciation: /ˈôrēˌənt
 
/

noun

1 (the Orient) literary The countries of Asia, especially eastern Asia.
2The special luster of a pearl of the finest quality.
More example sentences
  • The great value of this necklace was due not only to the size, the perfect shape and orient of the separate pearls, but to the fact that the whole set was perfectly matched.
  • Then from the inner room came the servants again, carrying two crowns like great hieratic tiaras, barbaric diadems, composed of pearls of the finest orient.
2.1A pearl of the finest quality.
More example sentences
  • Henry II had a hawk-glove sewn with twelve rubies and fifty-two great orients.

adjective

literary Back to top  
1Situated in or belonging to the east; oriental.
More example sentences
  • They were highly suspicious looking with lots of orient carpets and artwork but not really anything else.
  • The main and the biggest city, the capital of Japan - Tokyo - can be the starting point to this orient country.
1.1(Of the sun, daylight, etc.) rising.
More example sentences
  • A many-tinted, radiant Aurora, this fairest of Orient Light-bringers.
1.2(Especially of precious stones) lustrous (with reference to fine pearls from the East).
More example sentences
  • These pearls are orient, but they yield in whiteness to your teeth.

verb

Pronunciation: /ˈôrēˌent
 
/
Back to top  
1 [with object] Align or position (something) relative to the points of a compass or other specified positions: the fires are oriented in direct line with the midsummer sunset
More example sentences
  • She taught us how to use a compass to find true north and to orient a map accordingly.
  • Then orient your waterfall so you can see it from a patio or a favorite room.
  • For older children, show them how to orient the map and locate your position.
Synonyms
align, place, position, dispose
1.1Adjust or tailor (something) to specified circumstances or needs: magazines oriented to the business community [as adjective, in combination]: (-oriented) market-oriented economic reforms
More example sentences
  • Perhaps it would have been a decision that was less business-oriented but a more popular decision.
  • It seems your magazine is no longer content-oriented, it is now stuff-oriented.
  • For example, we are tailoring advanced individual training to make it assignment-oriented.
Synonyms
aim, direct, pitch, design, intend
1.2Guide (someone) physically in a specified direction.
More example sentences
  • A perioperative nurse orients the patient to the unit.
  • The Bible gives us guides whose stories orient us to a path they traveled long ago.
  • He also orients new employees on company values over pizza lunches and flew to Iraq to spend Christmas with his in-country expatriates.
2 (orient oneself) Find one’s position in relation to new and strange surroundings: there are no street names that would enable her to orient herself
More example sentences
  • You can orient yourself by facing the mountains, your back to Kingston Harbour.
  • It's disconcerting, coming from a city where you orient yourself by the river.
  • But the sun was shining and all felt well with the world, so I tucked in, whilst orienting myself with the city in my guide.
Synonyms
get/find one's bearings, establish one's location

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from Latin orient- 'rising or east', from oriri 'to rise'.

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