Definition of pachyderm in English:

pachyderm

Syllabification: pach·y·derm
Pronunciation: /ˈpakəˌdərm
 
/

noun

  • A very large mammal with thick skin, especially an elephant, rhinoceros, or hippopotamus.
    More example sentences
    • Apart from sheltering smaller wildlife like rabbits, gaur and jackal, a part of the estate forms an elephant trail which pachyderms from the Bannerghatta range frequent.
    • The station then lay well within the domain of the pachyderms i.e., the elephant corridor while migrating from one end of the Western Ghats to the other.
    • Conflicts between farmers and elephants have long been widespread in Africa, where pachyderms nightly destroy crops, raid grain houses, and sometimes kill people.

Derivatives

pachydermal

Pronunciation: /ˌpakəˈdərməl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Shaaks are plump, pachydermal herd animals with enormous rears that jut into the air, who often raised for three times their normal yield of meat.
  • Not surprisingly, Roman rulers often chose this pachydermal symbol of majestic light and omnipotence to appear on their coins.

pachydermatous

Pronunciation: /ˌpakəˈdərmətəs/
adjective
More example sentences
  • It was a broadside that left permanent scar tissue, but he was nothing if not a pachydermatous survivor.
  • A number of marked cutaneous changes were observed during the follow-up period: the skin currently appears thickened, indurated, redundant, and grayish, with a pachydermatous appearance.

pachydermic

Pronunciation: /ˌpakəˈdərmik/
adjective
More example sentences
  • And that doesn't even include Camby's energetically youthful presence on a Knicks team that's old, older, oldest, playing at a pachydermic pace that borders on the geriatric.
  • It also can be a focal point, as with the smooth and gray pachydermic monoliths of the European Beech, in the garden the year round.
  • In consequence of the great alterations in the skin of the limbs, which are covered with ulcerated tubercles, crusts, and cicatrices, the pachydermic state of skin which gives the limbs the appearance of elephantiasis, and of the lesions of the peripheral nerves which are present at this time, the sense of touch is abolished.

Origin

mid 19th century: from French pachyderme, from Greek pakhudermos, from pakhus 'thick' + derma 'skin'.

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Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
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a small amount; a little