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paleography

Syllabification: pa·le·og·ra·phy
Pronunciation: /ˌpālēˈäɡrəfē
 
/
(British palaeography)

Definition of paleography in English:

noun

The study of ancient writing systems and the deciphering and dating of historical manuscripts.
Example sentences
  • To do so, she learned Italian and Latin, and studied paleography.
  • In the case of the Arabic sources, a good command of paleography is required since many of them are still in manuscript form and transcribed in different regional scriptural traditions.
  • Historical interpretation of medieval English documents and records requires a reading knowledge of Latin and French and training in philology, paleography, and diplomatics, as well as in history.

Derivatives

paleographer

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The handwriting used in Italian documents from the eighth to the tenth centuries, and in some cases persisting beyond the eleventh century, belongs to the style palaeographers describe as ‘new cursive’.
  • ‘The script is very important for the date because the Aramaic script changed over time in ways we could measure,’ said a paleographer.
  • William F. Albright the famous paleographer said that every book of the New Testament was written by a baptized Jew between the 40's and 80's of the first century and very probably between 50 and 75.

paleographic

2
Pronunciation: /ˌpālēəˈɡrafik/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Gossett's contribution to the Textual Introduction stresses the paleographic aspects of the editorial task, including the description, history, and nature of the manuscript.
  • The tablet itself was dated to the fifteenth to fourteenth century BCE and was the first undisputed paleographic monument of its kind found in Thrace.
  • As he notes very self-revealingly, his paleographic skills and understanding of Basque and Spanish history were not up to the broad task, and he went off into other areas of Basque history for decades.

paleographical

3
Pronunciation: /ˌpālēəˈɡrafikəl/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Nonetheless, McCarter continued to refer to it for the rest of his presentation on the inscription's paleographical aspects.
  • Second, the author has chosen not to discuss in detail any historiographical or paleographical issues at stake in interpreting the manuscript tradition, aside from noting a few anachronistic details in certain images.
  • This manuscript, although richly illuminated, is not all that interesting from a paleographical perspective.

paleographically

4
Pronunciation: /ˌpālēəˈɡrafik(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • And this justifies the suggestion of a palaeographically easy emendation that will not produce an interrogative context.
  • Remember that before the excavation of Qumran, all of the published Qumran texts were palaeographically dated no later than mid-1st century.

Definition of paleography in:

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