There are 2 definitions of patter in English:

patter1

Syllabification: pat·ter
Pronunciation: /ˈpatər
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Make a repeated light tapping sound: a flurry of rain pattered against the window
More example sentences
  • The sound of rain pattering on the roof woke Miles up.
  • The sound of rain pattering on the pavement added to my feeling of hopelessness.
  • The sound of rain pattered above her, but her face was dry. ‘I must be inside,’ she thought.
Synonyms
go pitter-patter, tap, drum, beat, pound, rat-a-tat, go pit-a-pat, thrum
1.1Run with quick light steps: plovers pattered at the edge of the marsh
More example sentences
  • But I can't make myself pause and inhale the view today, instead I patter down the steps towards the rose gardens and another wedding.
  • Instead of her father's big booming steps, small feet pattered against the carpet.
  • I ran to the stair chamber, listening to the footfalls of the figure come back down the stairs with another pair of feet pattering quickly behind.
Synonyms
scurry, scuttle, skip, trip

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
A repeated light tapping: the rain had stopped its vibrating patter above him
More example sentences
  • The typewriter's tapping turns into the patter of rain as the story he's writing fades into the picture.
  • All I can hear is the light patter of the rain outside, and the sound of water dripping from my drenched self onto the car seat.
  • Three hours later, the last people were gone, and the rain was a steady patter on the roof.
Synonyms
pitter-patter, tapping, pattering, drumming, beat, beating, pounding, rat-a-tat, pit-a-pat, clack, thrum, thrumming

Origin

early 17th century: frequentative of pat1.

Definition of patter in:

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Word of the day antebellum
Pronunciation: ˌantɪˈbɛləm
adjective
occurring or existing before a particular war…

There are 2 definitions of patter in English:

patter2

Syllabification: pat·ter
Pronunciation: /
 
ˈpatər/

noun

1Rapid or smooth-flowing continuous talk, such as that used by a comedian or salesman: slick black hair, flashy clothes, and a New York line of patter
More example sentences
  • That said, we all agree that a gag works best when the punchline is not telegraphed, and when the comedian's patter at least feigns originality.
  • Is it any wonder their sales patter is slick with comments about the ‘savvy’ Irish buyers who ‘drive hard bargains’.
  • The lender will usually come up with its own estimate of rental income, which tends to be more realistic than the sales patter of letting agents.
Synonyms
prattle, prating, blather, blither, drivel, chatter, jabber, babble
informal yabbering, yatter
archaic twaddle
(sales) pitch, sales talk
informal line, spiel, elevator pitch
1.1Rapid speech included in a song, especially for comic effect: [as modifier]: a patter song of invective
More example sentences
  • Impeccable diction (even in patter songs), timing, and mimicry contributed to memorable character-monologues.
  • His diction, even in the most demanding patter songs, was wonderful.
  • He put on plays with his staff and fellows, delighting that he could dress in funny costumes and sing patter songs.
1.2The special language or jargon of a profession or other group: he picked up the patter from watching his dad
More example sentences
  • Rhyming slang was part of the general patter of traders and others, used as much for amusement as for secret communication.
  • The young people of Spain are becoming impressed with bullfighting again, the language of the fight part of their hip patter.
Synonyms
speech, language, parlance, dialect
informal lingo

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Talk at length without saying anything significant: she pattered on incessantly
More example sentences
  • She pattered on and on as we walked out the ramp to the airplane and were seated in the last row of the First Class section.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb in the sense 'recite (a prayer, charm, etc.) rapidly'): from paternoster. The noun dates from the mid 18th century.

Definition of patter in: