Definition of perdurable in English:

perdurable

Syllabification: per·dur·a·ble
Pronunciation: /pərˈd(y)o͝orəbəl
 
/

adjective

formal
  • Enduring continuously; imperishable.
    More example sentences
    • In his afterward, he describes the importance of addressing cliched plots and perdurable stereotypes, stating that in order to ‘set pen to paper’ he had to ‘break the back of the story’.
    • The mind craves to make something perdurable out of something as tenuous as candlelight, something that becomes more and more itself through vicissitude.
    • It is an indictment of the hubris of our politically correct age that a film asserting this perdurable truth about mankind's affairs will strike many as offensive.

Derivatives

perdurability

Pronunciation: /-ˌd(y)o͝orəˈbilitē/
noun
More example sentences
  • For him the perdurability of her literary style, well exemplified in this passage, can be traced to its occult quality, its ability to convey her ‘private gnosis.’
  • This huge, lavish show shares something with a Swiss watch and a Persian miniature: precision and perdurability in every cog or brush stroke, a harmony previously only imagined in the music of the spheres.

perdurably

adverb

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin perdurabilis, from Latin perdurare 'endure'.

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Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody