Definition of petulant in English:

petulant

Syllabification: pet·u·lant
Pronunciation: /ˈpeCHələnt
 
/

adjective

(Of a person or their manner) childishly sulky or bad-tempered: he was moody and petulant a petulant shake of the head
More example sentences
  • By midnight, he was pouting like a petulant kid being kept after school.
  • I cycled off, leaving him to glower after me like a petulant teenager.
  • It's all because I am consumed by trying to make it work right away, like some petulant child.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century (in the sense 'immodest'): from French pétulant, from Latin petulant- 'impudent' (related to petere 'aim at, seek'). The current sense (mid 18th century) is influenced by pettish.

Derivatives

petulantly

adverb
More example sentences
  • I looked up at this elegant, slender woman blessed with a large and loving family and plenty of resources and said, rather petulantly, ‘But she could find something else to do.’
  • But I have to petulantly admit that when I've capitulated and carried out their wishes, their ideas do feel right.
  • It is crucial that, if early decisions go against them, Celtic's players do not react petulantly and adopt a persecution complex.

Definition of petulant in:

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude