Definition of piggyback in English:

piggyback

Syllabification: pig·gy·back
Pronunciation: /ˈpigēˌbak
 
/

noun

  • A ride on someone’s back and shoulders.
    More example sentences
    • Now, for that, give me a piggyback ride back up this hill.
    • Colin and I were walking up the road in town when he decided he would rather have a piggyback.
    • I'll give Mike a piggyback into the party so he can arrive in style……

adjective

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  • 1On the back and shoulders of another person: a piggyback ride
    More example sentences
    • Here’s the priceless moment between David and his mom as he gives her a piggyback ride as a part of Korean wedding tradition.
    • I'd had the foresight to wear my waterproof hiking boots, so to save my wife's shoes from ruin I gave her a piggyback ride while she held the umbrella.
    • Now the younger monk was perturbed by his friend's conduct because their monastic code forbade them touching a woman, much less giving her a piggyback ride.
  • 1.1Attached to or riding on a larger object: a telescope with fittings for piggyback cameras
    More example sentences
    • The top carry handle also includes a 1/2-20 stud for piggyback camera mounting.
    • Piggyback mounts allow a camera to be mounted parallel to the axis of a telescope, such that camera and telescope are pointed at the same target.
    • Then a physician at Oxford University offered to include him in a test of a new piggyback device - an "axial flow pump" that pushes blood in a continuous stream (no pulse) through the heart's left ventricle and out into the body.

adverb

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  • On the back and shoulders of another person: he had to carry him piggyback
    More example sentences
    • Ben grasped Maya's legs and stood, proceeding to carry her piggyback down the apartment's short corridor to the kitchen.
    • She had been carrying Chase piggyback for some time, and now he was out cold.
    • They playfully rode piggyback on their team-mates' shoulders, duelling each other with loaded bottles of champagne.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Carry by or as if by piggyback.
    More example sentences
    • With his warm chubby arms around my neck, I piggybacked him about the yard, feeling the eyes of my family watching us through the windows.
    • Lexi had fallen asleep, so her dad piggybacked her to the village.
    • How fast could I get there carrying a plastic grocery sack of food in one hand, a dog on a leash with the other, and piggybacking a four-year-old boy?
  • 1.1Mount on or attach to (an existing object or system): providers of information have piggybacked their own networks onto the system
    More example sentences
    • A SOF distribution system is required to piggyback existing distribution nodes only as needed and maintain asset visibility to ensure prioritization, timeliness, and accountability.
    • Instead, Austrian shares are increasingly being seen as a way for investors to piggyback the economic upswing across the EU's accession states.
    • Instead, he said he intends to piggyback his intelligent computing network on mobile phone networks.
  • 1.2 [no object] Use existing work or an existing product as a basis or support: we were piggybacking on their training program
    More example sentences
    • However, the company has signalled its intention to enter the mobile market either by buying an existing player or by piggybacking on an another operator's network.
    • When user logs into his bank's website, the attacker piggybacks on that session via the Trojan to make any fraudulent transaction he wants.
    • A large proportion of the self-employed acquire coverage in health and dental plans by piggybacking on the employer-sponsored plan of a spouse or close relative.

Origin

mid 16th century (as an adverb): although analyzed by folk etymology in various ways from an early date, the word's origin remains obscure.

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