There are 3 definitions of pile in English:

pile1

Syllabification: pile
Pronunciation: /pīl
 
/

noun

  • 1A heap of things laid or lying one on top of another: he placed the books in a neat pile
    More example sentences
    • Dayra stood, menacing as always, and stared down at the crumpled mass lying on a pile of decaying straw in front of her, chained to the wall.
    • The amount of garbage the city generates is staggering - piles and piles of rubbish are heaped on the sidewalks by the end of the day.
    • One afternoon when I came on shift, I found it lying in a heap behind a pile of boxes.
    Synonyms
    heap, stack, mound, pyramid, mass, quantity; collection, accumulation, assemblage, store, stockpile, hoard
  • 1.1 informal A large amount of something: the growing pile of work
    More example sentences
    • Experts are at hand to advise you on how to put aside a little every month and invest it prudently, so that the little pile slowly grows into an appreciable amount within a few years.
    • Audiences around the world still get to their feet every night and the money pile continues to grow.
    • Are these questions to ask ourselves as the years pass, as the hostility grows, as the piles of dead mount on both sides?
    Synonyms
    great deal, lot, large quantity/amount, mountain; abundance, cornucopia
    informal load, heap, buttload, mass, slew, ocean, stack, ton
  • 1.2 informal A lot of money: he is admired for having made a pile for himself
    More example sentences
    • Unregulated, unwatched pile of money patronage-based political machines always need to keep running.
    • Is he giving any of that pile of money he made back to them?
    • Leiko quickly calculated exactly how high that pile of money would be.
  • 1.3A large imposing building or group of buildings: a Victorian Gothic pile
    More example sentences
    • Walter Scott, in one of his rare moments of happy economy, summed up the city skyline as mixed and massive piles - half church of God, half castle against the Scot.
    • The house itself is a pile built when Pitlochry was the chicest spa venue in early Victorian Britain.
    • The McKittrick Hotel is a gothic pile, quite similar in appearance to the Bates home.
  • 1.4A series of plates of dissimilar metals laid one on another alternately to produce an electric current.
  • 1.5 dated term for nuclear reactor.
    More example sentences
    • In the basement of the unused football stadium of the University of Chicago, scientists Enrico Fermi and Arthur Compton built an atomic pile and in December 1942 produced the first chain reaction in uranium.
    • Another display that caught my attention was the diorama showing Enrique Fermi and George While controlling the reaction at the world's first atomic pile CP - 1.
    • Bent on defeating Nazi Germany, Wigner worked on plutonium production and made superb engineering designs for the air-cooled atomic pile built by the DuPont Corporation.
  • 1.6 archaic A funeral pyre.
    More example sentences
    • The following morning Priam bade his people go gather wood for the burial, and after nine days the body of Hector was laid on the pile and burned.
    • Then the corpse is brought and laid in the midst; the pile is kindled and the roaring flame rises, mingled with weeping, till all is consumed.

verb

Back to top  
  • 1 [with object] Place (things) one on top of another: she piled all the groceries on the counter
    More example sentences
    • He became notorious for piling his plate high and refilling it frequently, even wrapping a few pieces of chicken in a hanky and stuffing them in his pocket to eat later.
    • My mother was piling her plate high with a greasy, fatty, fry-up of a mixed grill and tucking in with gusto.
    • The checkout girls are friendly as she piles her groceries onto the conveyor belt.
    Synonyms
    heap (up), stack (up)
  • 1.1 (be piled with) Be stacked or loaded with: his in-box was piled high with papers
    More example sentences
    • She wore a cloak about her shoulders that was piled with what looked like swan feathers.
    • Tables were piled with textbooks for homeschoolers, tomes denouncing evolution, booklets waxing nostalgic for the antebellum South.
    • The food bank shelves were piled with enough items to last eight weeks, said Jennifer Hayward, the food bank's treasurer.
    Synonyms
    load, heap, fill (up), lade, stack, charge, stock
  • 1.2 (pile up) [no object] Increase in quantity: the work has piled up
    More example sentences
    • In a shabby room near the shop, sacks of blood clams were piled up.
    • Rubbish and shopping bags full of human faeces were piled up in the garden along with stolen handbags and credit cards.
    • About a dozen wooden pallets had been piled up behind the shop's back entrance and set alight at about 9.15 pm.
  • 1.3 (pile something up) Cause to increase in quantity: the debts he piled up
    More example sentences
    • He is piling them up because the stacks serve as a kind of yardstick, measuring a new social phenomenon that is gaining ground in Germany.
    • I pile them up in great heaps on my working desk and, honestly, I really do know where things are in all that mess.
    • A lot of people just take horse poo out of the stables from the bedding and pile it up as manure heaps.
    Synonyms
    increase, grow, mount up, escalate, soar, spiral, leap up, shoot up, rocket, climb, accumulate, accrue, build up, multiply
  • 1.4 (pile something on) • informal Intensify or exaggerate something for effect: you can pile on the guilt, but my heart has turned to stone
    More example sentences
    • Miklós Rózsa's score, with its creepy Theramin-style theme, is way too insistent, piling the dramatic effects on so thickly that it becomes distracting.
    • Strange effects are piled on, and the song builds to a powerful climax of heavily distorted guitars and bleeping synthesizers.
    • Over the years as bandwidth got cheaper, extra features were piled on until it no longer mattered how small a file was, it only mattered that it could be viewed correctly.
  • 2 [no object] (pile in/out) (Of a group of people) get into or out of a vehicle in a disorganized manner: we all piled in and headed off to our mysterious destination my students piled out of three cars
    More example sentences
    • We all piled out of the vehicles and set up a defensive perimeter with our weapons pointing out.
    • We finally arrived at a section of waterfront and piled out of the vehicles to look at birds.
    • It was ten by the time we piled out of Torry's vehicle and headed into the summerhouse.
    Synonyms
    crowd, climb, pack, squeeze, push, shove
  • 2.1 (pile into) (Of a vehicle) crash into: 60 cars piled into each other on I-95
    More example sentences
    • The big final was a typically full-blooded affair, with a complete restart being called as the cars piled into each other before the green flag fell.
    • The stunts are staged to increase the spectacle, so that when cars pile into each other or toy robots battle, there is an intricate detail and near artistic quality.
    • Her twin sister Carly, who was in the front passenger seat, suffered a perforated eardrum and cuts from the smashed windscreen after the car piled into undergrowth.

Phrases

make one's pile

informal Make a lot of money.
More example sentences
  • It's largely the preserve of TV comedians who've made their pile and are now desperately seeking some late - career credibility.
  • This is quite different from someone who has made their pile and bought a club as a hobby, much like buying a racehorse.
  • Both have made their pile and are looking for something to do.
Synonyms
fortune, millions, billions
informal small fortune, bundle, wad

pile arms

see stack arms at stack.
More example sentences
  • The seamen from HMS Excellent were tasked to take over, piling arms and improvising drag ropes from lengths of rope commandeered from the railway station.
  • In piling arms, after the firelocks are properly fixed, the pikes are generally placed across the muzzles.

pile it on

informal Exaggerate the seriousness of a situation or of someone’s behavior to increase guilt or distress.
More example sentencesSynonyms
exaggerate, overstate the case, make a mountain out of a molehill, overdo it, overplay it, overdramatize
informal lay it on thick

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin pila 'pillar, pier'.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 3 definitions of pile in English:

pile2

Syllabification: pile
Pronunciation: /
 
pīl/

noun

  • 2 Heraldry A triangular charge or ordinary formed by two lines meeting at an acute angle, usually pointing down from the top of the shield.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • Strengthen or support (a structure) with piles.

Origin

Old English pīl 'dart, arrow', also 'pointed stake', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pijl and German Pfeil, from Latin pilum '(heavy) javelin'.

More definitions of pile

Definition of pile in:

There are 3 definitions of pile in English:

pile3

Syllabification: pile
Pronunciation: /
 
pīl/

noun

  • The soft projecting surface of a carpet or of a fabric such as velvet or flannel, consisting of many small threads.
    More example sentences
    • Velveteen is an all cotton pile fabric with short pile resembling velvet.
    • The apartment was covered in wall-to-wall thick tan pile carpeting.
    • Cut pile carpet has yarn that is cut at the surface rather than looped back to the carpet.
    Synonyms

verb

[with object, usually in combination] (-piled) Back to top  
  • Furnish with a pile: a thick-piled carpet

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'downy feather'): from Latin pilus 'hair'. The noun sense dates from the mid 16th century.

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