There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink1

Syllabification: pink
Pronunciation: /piNGk
 
/

adjective

1Of a color intermediate between red and white, as of coral or salmon: her healthy pink cheeks bright pink lipstick
More example sentences
  • Remove the pink corals from the white scallops then wrap strips of smoked salmon round the sides of the scallops.
  • The skin should be smooth and have a white or light pink colour.
  • Some of the later flowering hybrids are more unusual in their colour with pink trumpets and white petals.
Synonyms
rose, rosy, rosé, pale red, salmon, coral;
flushed, blushing
1.1(Of wine) rosé.
Example sentences
  • The good news is that just as still pink wines have become respectable over the past decade, slowly so has rosé champagne, with more care taken over its production.
  • Spain also takes pink wines seriously - so seriously that it has at least two names for them, depending on the intensity of the colour.
  • Maybe it wasn't all pink champagne and roses last night after all.
2 informal , often derogatory Having or showing left-wing tendencies: pale pink politics
More example sentences
  • However, the pink revolution failed with the victory of a hardliner.
3Of or associated with homosexuals: a boom in the pink economy
More example sentences
  • Perhaps more importantly, the realisation that both the pink pound and pocket money were untapped, encouraged the wave of celebrity media around today.
  • There is a massive wedding market in the Borders and a lot of hotels are going to try and cash in on the pink pound.
  • I'm fed up with this convenient courting of the pink pound - I don't want to be equal just because I'm financially valuable!

noun

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1Pink color, material, or pigment: she looks good in pink
More example sentences
  • Katie glared at her, she absolutely hated the color pink.
  • I smiled, watching her face go from the color pink to red.
  • Ruffled clothes and the color pink really didn't suit me.
1.1 (also hunting pink) The red clothing or material worn by fox hunters.
Example sentences
  • More than 1,200 of them including farmers, gamekeepers and riders in hunting pink warned that their action was the start of a ‘summer of discontent’ to highlight opposition in the countryside to the threatened ban.
  • Just when hunting pink is to be outlawed, cagoule red is being given the green light today, with armies of walkers now allowed to wander across ‘private’ property
  • Banning battery farming would do a lot more good than banning hunting, but there isn't the emotional punch of watching Otis cry because he'll have to donate his hunting pink to Oxfam.
2The best condition or degree: the economy is not in the pink of health
More example sentences
  • It is everybody's knowledge that the construction sector is not in the pink of health.
  • An unseen intruder tries to pull the plug on his life-support system but the guy is a lousy assassin - instead of dying, Alexander wakes up, attractive, rumpled and pretty much in the pink of physical health.
  • You will be in the pink of health and will experience an increase in wealth.
Synonyms
prime, perfection, best, finest, height;
utmost, greatest, apex, zenith, acme, bloom
3 informal , often derogatory A person with left-wing tendencies. See also pinko.

Origin

mid 17th century: from pink2, the early use of the adjective being to describe the color of the flowers of this plant.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

Phrases

in the pink

1
informal In very good health and spirits.
Example sentences
  • For many firms, health care design is in the pink.
  • Mr Ramsden said today: ‘We are absolutely in the pink now it's back.’
  • This keeps doctors in the pink, so to speak, and gives the sisters opportunity to discuss at length which medicos hands are colder than the others.
Synonyms
in good health, very healthy, very well, hale and hearty;
blooming, flourishing, thriving, vigorous, strong, lusty, robust, in fine fettle, (as) fit as a fiddle, in excellent shape

turn (or go) pink

2
Blush.
Example sentences
  • Well I was all ready to tell my story, when I saw him, a new face in that common crowd, he was a really cute guy and as I saw him, I blushed my cheeks turning pink, and I knew he was the one.
  • The immense, treelike Trina Mack stood up next, her tan face gorgeous as it turned pink with a blush.
  • Then Sara watched him watch her, her cheeks flushing and his ears turning pink.

Derivatives

pinkish

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • Those are the pinkish reddish bits in the four corners.
  • The peel is orange, the flesh is pinkish to rosy orange, and the flavor is a little sweeter than that of the regular navel.
  • It took twenty minutes to put on some perfume and a light pinkish / reddish lipstick.

pinkly

2
adverb
Example sentences
  • When she opened the cupboard, Alvin saw the inch-high Tyrannosaurus erect and gaping pinkly among the mugs.
  • His hands were broad and strong with fine, long fingers and, like me, he baked a nut brown under the summer sun until his fingernails glowed pinkly against his skin.
  • Almost constantly, the long tongue would loll pinkly from his jaws and lap at the bare, shiny patches of burnt skin that stretched across his torso and over one forearm.

pinkness

3
noun
Example sentences
  • Lightning was blazing the sky with colour, making the clouds glow with an evil pinkness.
  • My cheeks are flushed as I gasp for air, and their rosy pinkness glows like a sunrise.
  • On one hand the head-to-toe pinkness is terribly cute, but it serves no practical purpose at this age, does it?

pinky

4
adjective
Example sentences
  • The skin was scraped off both pinky toes almost immediately.
  • The face of Illinois politics is jowlier, usually has a cigar, a pinky ring.
  • I've brought home some reddy-yelloey ones and some bluey-reddy / pinky ones.

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There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink2

Syllabification: pink
Pronunciation: /piNGk
 
/

noun

A herbaceous Eurasian plant with sweet-smelling pink or white flowers and slender, typically gray-green, leaves.
Example sentences
  • Don't plant daisies, pinks, dianthus and carnations.
  • A brief overview of the different characteristics of carnations, pinks, and sweet Williams will perhaps help you to make wise choices for your garden.
  • These included lilacs, lindens, Virginia creeper, marigolds, sunflowers, honeysuckle, pinks, and daisies.

Origin

late 16th century: perhaps short for pink eye, literally 'small or half-shut eye'; compare with the synonymous French word oeillet, literally 'little eye'.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

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There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink3

Syllabification: pink
Pronunciation: /piNGk
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Cut a scalloped or zigzag edge on: (as adjective pinked) a bonnet with pinked edging
More example sentences
  • Ornamental gauntlets with swirling embroidery and pinked edges were patented by F. Farrant.
  • Fancier edge stitches could include binding with Lycra, blanket stitch, pinking, overcast with the serger, or turning under and stitching.
1.1Pierce or nick (someone) slightly with a weapon or missile.
2 archaic Decorate: April pinked the earth with flowers

Origin

early 16th century (in the sense 'pierce or nick slightly'): compare with Low German pinken 'strike, peck'.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

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There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink4

Syllabification: pink
Pronunciation: /piNGk
 
/

noun

historical
A small square-rigged sailing ship, typically with a narrow, overhanging stern.
Example sentences
  • A pink was a sailing ship with a narrow stern, originally small and flat-bottomed.

Origin

late 15th century: from Middle Dutch pin(c)ke, of unknown ultimate origin; compare with Spanish pinque and Italian pinco.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

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There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink5

Line breaks: pink

Entry from British & World English dictionary

verb

[no object] British
(Of a vehicle engine) make a series of rattling sounds as a result of over-rapid combustion of the fuel-air mixture in the cylinders: the car was inclined to pink slightly in accelerating from a low engine speed

Origin

early 20th century: imitative.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

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There are 6 main definitions of pink in English:

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pink6

Syllabification: pink
Pronunciation: /piNGk
 
/

noun

dated
A yellowish lake pigment made by combining vegetable coloring matter with a white base.

Origin

mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

More
  • A pink (Dianthus) is a plant with sweet-smelling flowers which are usually various shades of pink, purple, or white. The use of pink for the colour beloved by little girls actually comes from the flower, rather than the other way round. Similarly, several other languages use the rose as their source for the colour, and since the early 20th century fuchsia (named after the 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs) has been used for a distinctive shade of deep pink. Shakespeare uses the pink flower to signify the supreme example of something in Romeo and Juliet: ‘I am the very pink of courtesy.’ Here he was probably making a pun on the expression the flower of, meaning ‘the finest part or example’. This Shakespearean phrase led to the development of the expression in the pink of condition, which by the early 18th century was shortened to simply in the pink ‘in very good health and spirits’. The plant name appeared in the mid 16th century, but its origin is not known for certain. It may be short for pink eye ‘small or half-shut eye’, which would make the name like its French equivalent oeillet, which means ‘little eye’. Pink in the sense of the sort of sound an engine makes when cooling dates only from the early 20th century and imitates the sound.

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