There are 2 definitions of pitch in English:

pitch1

Syllabification: pitch
Pronunciation: /piCH
 
/

noun

1The quality of a sound governed by the rate of vibrations producing it; the degree of highness or lowness of a tone: a car engine seems to change pitch downward as the vehicle passes you
More example sentences
  • She re-taught herself to feel the vibration of the sounds, registering pitch and tone through the buzz of her body, often playing barefoot.
  • They have never heard sounds, so can't understand tones or pitches, or modulate their speech.
  • Lao is a tonal language; therefore, the meaning of a word is determined by the tone or pitch at which it is spoken.
Synonyms
tone, timbre, key, modulation, frequency
1.1A standard degree of highness or lowness used in performance: the guitars were strung and tuned to pitch See also concert pitch.
More example sentences
  • Scrupulous about vocal production, she maintains classical standards of pitch and articulation in pop renditions.
  • She had some problems keeping pitch and the tone of her voice did not suit her role.
  • She had presence, faultless pitch and crystal clear tone.
2The steepness of a slope, especially of a roof.
More example sentences
  • Keeping a steep roof pitch and adding dormers to the new second story are good options.
  • He also varies roof pitch according to a region's latitude and climate.
  • While bed and bathrooms are private, enclosed volumes, living and dining rooms have been opened up to the full extent of the roof pitch.
Synonyms
2.1 Climbing A section of a climb, especially a steep one.
More example sentences
  • We spent all day learning the basics, but it was still so much fun climbing those tree-filled pitches.
  • She completed a one hundred mile run and climbed a five pitch route in the middle.
  • Once you are caught on a course with a steep pitch, protruding roots and boulders, you will experience ‘complete fear’.
2.2The height to which a hawk soars before swooping on its prey.
More example sentences
  • The bird was at a pitch of about 300ft.
  • I have seen falcons kill partridges from low pitches.
  • He was climbing to his pitch at a distance.
3 [in singular] The level of intensity of something: he brought the machine to a high pitch of development
More example sentences
  • It has intensified to a higher pitch again recently.
  • But now, with the Public Sphere growing increasingly irrelevant, it is reaching a critical pitch.
  • It has grown to such a level and such a pitch that I'm sure it's a cause of many people's disquiet.
Synonyms
level, intensity, point, degree, height, extent
3.1 (a pitch of) A very high degree of: rousing herself to a pitch of indignation
More example sentences
  • The show maintained a pitch of incredible intensity from the opening number.
  • He begins slowly, building to a pitch of excitement, like a preacher.
  • Ballet reached a pitch of popularity during the first half of the 19th century.
4 Baseball A legal delivery of the ball by the pitcher.
More example sentences
  • Sometimes five wild pitches in one inning aren't enough to keep a team from a win.
  • He was determined to go after hitters rather than trying to make the perfect pitch.
  • He has been criticized for using one pitch too often or failing to set up hitters.
Synonyms
throw, fling, hurl, toss, lob; delivery
informal heave
4.1 (also pitch shot) Golf A high approach shot onto the green.
More example sentences
  • There is no easier pitch shot than the one from halfway up the bank.
  • He smashed the ball up short of the green, his pitch ran 15 feet past and he missed the putt.
  • On 14, Mark hit a lovely pitch just past the flag that skidded over the green.
4.2 Football short for pitchout (sense 2).
5British A playing field.
More example sentences
  • Having two teams play home games on the same pitch over an English winter would have done more damage to the surface than would a farmer with a plough.
  • There are outdoor tennis and football pitches, jogging paths and spaces for barbecues.
  • For the first time for many years, England fans booed the team off the pitch.
5.1 Cricket The strip of ground between the two sets of stumps.
More example sentences
  • Before he began hitting sixes he adjusted the bails of the stumps and analysed the pitch.
  • The English camp was unhappy with the condition of the pitch at Melbourne for the Second Test match.
  • The way to take wickets on these pitches is to force batsmen to make mistakes, and the South Africans did that.
6A form of words used when trying to persuade someone to buy or accept something: a good sales pitch
More example sentences
  • Half a dozen sales pitches are underway at any one time.
  • The sales pitch was very convincing.
  • They were criticised by analysts and fund managers for not making a stronger pitch for the US company.
Synonyms
patter, talk
informal spiel, line, elevator pitch
7A swaying or oscillation of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle around a horizontal axis perpendicular to the direction of motion.
More example sentences
  • They have long been known for their function as flight stabilizers, like gyroscopes on airplanes that prevent excessive roll, pitch or yaw.
  • The system is complemented by a set of midship stabilising fins and stern stabilising flaps to control the pitch and roll of the ship.
  • It's the up-and-down motion of the airplane as it changes pitch due to disturbances that have the greatest effect on people.
8 technical The distance between successive corresponding points or lines, e.g., between the teeth of a cogwheel.
More example sentences
  • One of the belt's major design improvements is the pitch, or the distance between belt teeth.
  • The keys are manufactured with 4 accurately positioned perforations corresponding to the pitch of the cogwheel.
8.1A measure of the angle of the blades of a screw propeller, equal to the distance forward a blade would move in one revolution if it exerted no thrust on the medium.
More example sentences
  • As a grader, you control the blade depth with auxiliary hydraulics and the blade pitch using the attachment hydraulic.
  • That combination allows operators to adjust blade pitch quickly, on the fly, with very little effort.
  • In the Weber system, one of the weights is keyed solid with constant pitch while the other weight is allowed to move 180 in pitch.
8.2The density of typed or printed characters on a line, typically expressed as numbers of characters per inch.
More example sentences
  • A font may have a fixed pitch or a proportional one.
  • The pitch of the font should be at least 10, with a pitch of 12 preferred.

verb

Back to top  
1 [with object] Baseball Throw (the ball) for the batter to try to hit.
More example sentences
  • He threw the ball back to her and she gave the batter a whole two seconds before pitching the same ball.
  • He was due to pitch the first ball of a crunch baseball match in New York between the Yankees and the Arizona Diamondbacks.
  • Just as Billy pitched the ball, I made eye contact with him.
1.1 [no object] Baseball Be a pitcher: she pitched in a minor-league game [with object]: he pitched the entire game
More example sentences
  • He converted 19 of his first 20 chances despite pitching with a sore elbow.
  • The best pitchers made more starts, pitched more innings and piled up more wins.
  • He pitched to three more batters before collapsing on the mound.
1.2 Golf Hit (the ball) onto the green with a pitch shot.
More example sentences
  • Once you become proficient at pitching the ball, you'll want to convert more putts for par - and cut down on three-putts.
  • He pitched onto the green, where an evil eight-footer awaited him.
  • He pitched back onto the green some 30 feet away, and then almost putted it off the green before gunning it long again.
1.3 [no object] Golf (Of the ball) strike the ground in a particular spot.
More example sentences
  • The ball pitched 15 feet from the hole, bounced three times and dropped in.
  • Replays showed that the ball had pitched outside leg stump, but it was too late for recriminations.
  • It is possible to plot where the ball pitched, and where the batsman's shot went, allowing all those graphs to be drawn.
2 [with object] Throw or fling roughly or casually: he crumpled the page up and pitched it into the fireplace
More example sentences
  • Their riders were pitched onto the road and then ploughed under the hooves of the other six steeds.
  • As if in slow motion, the horse stumbled, rolling his front legs and pitching his rider over his head.
  • She was suddenly pitched to the floor.
Synonyms
2.1 [no object] Fall heavily, especially headlong: she pitched forward into blackness
More example sentences
  • The big ex-con pitches forward and falls behind the counter.
  • I pitched forward and toppled over the rail.
  • As she pitched forward, about to fall, someone caught her by her upper arms.
Synonyms
fall, tumble, topple, plunge, plummet
3 [with object] Set (one’s voice or a piece of music) at a particular pitch: you’ve pitched the melody very high
More example sentences
  • She didn't need to pitch her voice lower, for the teeth-rattling music took care of the concept of being overheard.
  • He called back, pitching his voice like a girl's.
  • Was it just me or was he pitching his voice rather high?
3.1Express at a particular level of difficulty: he should pitch his talk at a suitable level for the age group
3.2Aim (a product) at a particular section of the market: the machine is being pitched at banks
4 [no object] Make a bid to obtain a contract or other business: they were pitching for an account
More example sentences
  • Some companies are actively pitching for business.
  • We have gone out aggressively pitching for new business.
  • You're pitching for business abroad and attending offshore meetings on a more regular basis.
5 [with object] Set up and fix in a definite position: we pitched camp for the night
More example sentences
  • With temperatures plummeting, the council ordered winter camps to be pitched.
  • Saturday night saw the Raise The Roof benefit pitch its tent at the Rosemount Hotel.
  • Perhaps they'll end up pitching their tents somewhere on Romney Marsh.
Synonyms
6 [no object] (Of a moving ship, aircraft, or vehicle) rock or oscillate around a lateral axis, so that the front and back move up and down: the little steamer pressed on, pitching gently
More example sentences
  • Swaying in the wind, they're concerned about the timing in getting on deck, with the ship pitching hard up and down.
  • Although the sea washed the heads clean as the ship pitched, the heads still needed a regular scrub-down with a broom.
  • Then we hit some turbulence, and both aircraft pitched and rolled a little bit.
Synonyms
lurch, toss (about), plunge, roll, reel, sway, rock, keel, list, wallow, labor
6.1(Of a vehicle) move with a vigorous jogging motion: a jeep came pitching down the hill
More example sentences
  • The car pitched and dodged through the turns.
  • The truck accelerated as it pitched down the hill.
  • The truck pitched through the snow as we made our way to the Refuge.
7 [with object] Cause (a roof) to slope downward from the ridge: the roof was pitched at an angle of 75 degrees (as adjective pitched) a pitched roof
More example sentences
  • The sod roof is pitched to match the angle of the adjacent weathered trees to further blend it with the dominant land form.
  • The roof is pitched, making the north windows tall and generous, as you'd want them to be in a studio, while the south windows are squeezed a bit to control light.
  • The gently pitched roof and wood joinery recall the Craftsman and Japanese influences that hold such significant places in Bay Area architecture.
7.1 [no object] Slope downward: the ravine pitches down to the creek
More example sentences
  • Its 17-foot ceiling pitches gently upward to the west, to let in additional light and capture all three views.
  • The roof pitched down from the wall of the main house, too low to stand under at the far end.
  • The stream pitches down over a solid rock about 40 feet.

Origin

Middle English (as a verb in the senses 'thrust (something pointed) into the ground' and 'fall headlong'): perhaps related to Old English picung 'stigmata', of unknown ultimate origin. The sense development is obscure.

Phrases

make a pitch

Make a bid to obtain a contract or other business.
More example sentences
  • The group pondered making a pitch for the 2016 Games.
  • Sweeney is making a pitch for some of the contract work.
  • They were about to make a pitch for a multi-million pound account.
Synonyms
try to obtain, try to acquire, try to get, bid for, make a bid for

Phrasal verbs

pitch in

informal Vigorously join in to help with a task or activity.
More example sentences
  • I woke reasonably early and pitched in to the task of cleaning up the old computer, and getting backups and transfer files ready for the new one.
  • We now call upon our loyal readers to pitch in here and assist with the composing of this work.
  • Her husband, son and son's girlfriend pitched in and voluntarily did many of the housekeeping tasks she could no longer do.
Synonyms
help (out), assist, lend a hand, join in, participate, contribute, do one's bit, chip in, cooperate, collaborate
Join in a fight or dispute.
More example sentences
  • They trying to influence the debate but there are so many other bodies pitching in with their own comments.
  • We should pitch in to the fight rather than whinge.
  • Damien pitched in angrily.

pitch into

informal Vigorously tackle or begin to deal with.
More example sentences
  • So I pitched into the morning house clean routine, left all neat, tidy and sparkling clean, and took myself and the little silver Ford off to Boston.
  • In spite of all my resolutions not to do so I pitched into a final code fix for my new web pages today.
  • He prepares to roll up his sleeves and pitch into the parochial difficulties that await him.
Forcefully assault.
More example sentences
  • The governor was up for re-election and the opposition papers were pitching into him.
  • I despise him so I can't help pitching into him.
  • He pitched into her recklessly, upbraiding her now for her shiftlessness.

pitch out

Throw a pitchout.
More example sentences
  • On three occasions, he was thrown out because opponents pitched out and guessed right.
  • They slide-step to the plate, throw to first base more often and pitch out frequently.
  • The Rangers pitched out to Palmeiro, who had no chance to bunt, and tagged out Garret Anderson in a rundown.

Definition of pitch in:

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Pronunciation: ˌprɛməˈnɪʃ(ə)n
noun
a strong feeling that something will happen …

There are 2 definitions of pitch in English:

pitch2

Syllabification: pitch
Pronunciation: /
 
piCH/

noun

1A sticky resinous black or dark brown substance that is semiliquid when hot, hard when cold. It is obtained by distilling tar or petroleum and is used for waterproofing.
More example sentences
  • There was a small boat, an improvised currach-type constructed from hessian stretched over a wooden frame and doused with pitch to make it waterproof.
  • The production of tar and pitch as well as potash and saltpeter is included in the category of proto-industry.
  • All his exports for which we still have record were cloth; he imported herring and dried fish, ashes, iron, lumber, oil, pitch and tar.
1.1Any of various substances similar to pitch, such as asphalt or bitumen.
More example sentences
  • The heat was so intense that the pitch that held the deck together melted.
  • Some bone would need to be cut before the pitch was applied.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Cover, coat, or smear with pitch.
More example sentences
  • He would pitch the seams so that they wouldn't leak.
  • The tar from these springs is used by fur traders and others in the country for pitching boats and canoes.
  • Near the bridge are several heaps of Babylonian pitch, to pitch ships.

Origin

Old English pic (noun), pician (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pek and German Pech; based on Latin pix, pic-.

Definition of pitch in: