Definition of plant in English:

plant

Syllabification: plant
Pronunciation: /plant
 
/

noun

1A living organism of the kind exemplified by trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses, ferns, and mosses, typically growing in a permanent site, absorbing water and inorganic substances through its roots, and synthesizing nutrients in its leaves by photosynthesis using the green pigment chlorophyll.
More example sentences
  • Eventually, it melts to supply water and nutrients to plants and aquatic organisms.
  • The satellites monitor the green pigment in plants, or chlorophyll, which leads to estimates of phytoplankton amounts.
  • As they grow, green plants and trees fix carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and convert it to tissue.
Synonyms
flower, vegetable, herb, shrub, weed; (plants)vegetation, greenery, flora, herbage, verdure
1.1A small plant, as distinct from a shrub or tree: garden plants
More example sentences
  • Still, the same rule can be applied in a household garden when planting herbaceous plants and smaller shrubs.
  • However, in a few cases, seeds of plants cultivated in botanical gardens were also used.
  • The front garden also has numerous plants and shrubs.

Plants differ from animals in lacking specialized sense organs, having no capacity for voluntary movement, having cell walls, and growing to suit their surroundings rather than having a fixed body plan

2A place where an industrial or manufacturing process takes place: the company has 30 plants in Mexico
More example sentences
  • The tariffs that protected these industries also encouraged heavy manufacturing, so that giant car plants were located on the fringe of the postwar city.
  • One of the most expensive departments in a car plant is the paint shop, so DeLorean saved the money and pretended that the brushed stainless steel finish was a style feature.
  • Avoid the oil refineries and industrial plants around the commercial shipping channel.
Synonyms
factory, works, foundry, mill, workshop, shop
informal salt mine(s)
2.1Machinery used in an industrial or manufacturing process: inadequate investment in new plant
More example sentences
  • The company auctions excess inventory such as industrial plant and machinery online, and claims the process is secure for both vendors and bidders.
  • The appellants were involved in the design, manufacture, supply and installation of plant and machinery for the steel manufacturing industry.
  • He says it has also set annual targets for operational efficiency, including plant and machinery downtime.
3A person placed in a group as a spy or informer: we thought he was a CIA plant spreading disinformation
More example sentences
  • Elizabeth was convinced that Paul was a CIA plant there to spy on her.
  • I could tell she was a plant the minute she started speaking.
Synonyms
spy, informant, informer, agent, secret agent, mole, infiltrator, operative
informal spook
3.1A thing put among someone’s belongings to incriminate or compromise them: he insisted that the cocaine in the glove compartment was a plant
More example sentences
  • Within two days they were exploring the possibility that the note was a plant and that the saboteurs might not be a terrorist group after all, but possibly a disgruntled railroad employee.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Place (a seed, bulb, or plant) in the ground so that it can grow.
More example sentences
  • For the last two years Joshua, a year four pupil at Moorhouse Primary School, has helped her to plant seeds, bulbs and plants and to tidy the garden.
  • In this paper we report on patterns of growth rings formed in four species of alpine forbs that were grown from seed and were planted in a restoration experiment on an alpine ski run in the Swiss Alps.
  • Now is the time to plan and plant flower bulbs for the holidays for both gifts and decorations.
Synonyms
sow, scatter, seed; bed out, transplant
1.1Place a seed, bulb, or plant in (a place) to grow: the garden is planted with herbs
More example sentences
  • In August, open areas can be planted with perennial cover crops such as clover or sainfoin, sometimes called esparcet or holy clover.
  • We had a large kitchen garden and occasionally planted a small field of corn but we did not maintain a high operation farm like the majority of our neighbors.
  • A bit of a waste of a resource when we could be planting plantations on cleared land, instead of chopping down magnificent forests.
1.2 informal Bury (someone).
More example sentences
  • She has threatened him, who apparently is a very nice chap, that if he takes any more of our votes, she's going to plant him in the ground with his trees.
  • He won't be mentioned too very much here due to the fact that we planted him 13 years ago and he's just been no fun since.
2Place or fix in a specified position: she planted a kiss on his cheek
More example sentences
  • Next thing I know a quite attractive dark haired woman, in her late twenties I think, has wrapped her arms around my neck and planted a very solid kiss on my lips.
  • Then he grabbed me by the head and planted an enormous red kiss on my cheek.
  • He swivels his head towards her, planting a light sweet kiss on her lips.
Synonyms
place, put, set, position, situate, settle
informal plonk
2.1 (plant oneself) Position oneself: she planted herself on the arm of his chair
More example sentences
  • Klaxons and alarums rang out, and soldiers and archers and mages by the thousands surrounded the castle and planted themselves in prearranged positions.
  • The woman hands a bag of food to her daughter, strides up to the swings, plants herself directly before her son and in one motion wraps her arms around the boy's legs, tackling him in mid-air.
  • And, while you have little control over random run-ins at school, you must stop strategically planting yourself in the bleachers during his soccer practice.
2.2Establish (an idea) in someone’s mind: the seed of doubt is planted in his mind
More example sentences
  • After the germ of the idea was first planted in her mind by the deserted camp at Spring Hill, she set to researching Cotswold life during wartime years.
  • This new idea which had been planted subconsciously in his mind by a man with no reading or writing skills, began to give him a healthy respect for himself.
  • I could accidentally plant suggestions in your mind, or take you someplace dangerous.
Synonyms
instill, implant, impress, imprint, put, place, introduce, fix, establish, lodge
2.3Secretly place (a bomb that is set to go off at a later time).
More example sentences
  • In a separate incident in Jebaliya, the army said it shot a man who was throwing grenades and planting a bomb.
  • Sources said that two time bombs were planted to destroy the antenna which exploded simultaneously.
  • His plan failed when he ran out of money for explosives and his conspirators planted the bomb next to the wrong support structure within the basement of the building.
2.4Put or hide (something) among someone’s belongings to compromise or incriminate the owner: he planted drugs on him to extort a bribe
More example sentences
  • I decided to plant an imposter cava among the seven authentic champagnes.
  • After all, if someone has gained control of a suspect's computer couldn't incriminated material be planted?
  • She probably made him plant false evidence to hide what really happened that day.
Synonyms
hide, conceal, secrete
2.5Send (someone) to join a group or organization to act as a spy or informer.
More example sentences
  • He was in fact an undercover officer planted by the Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office.
  • As for him, he's convinced that he is an agent who's been planted to subvert India.
  • They combined nobility of thought with practical incapacity; they did not spot the Gestapo informer planted on them.
2.6Found or establish (a colony, city, or community).
More example sentences
  • Mission groups travel outside the city to plant and nurture new faith communities.
  • At the same time, however, Alexander planted new Greek cities across his empire.
  • They talked occasionally of planting colonies, but were diverted by the war.
2.7Deposit (young fish, spawn, oysters, etc.) in a river or lake.
More example sentences
  • This indicated that some of the original fifteen thousand young fish planted in 1871 had survived and matured.
  • Later, he did not take it for granted that the fish in a river could simply be planted as needed.
  • Crawfish has been planted in many lakes in Sweden, to ensure some fun times and some home-cooked crawfish.

Origin

Old English plante 'seedling', plantian (verb), from Latin planta 'sprout, cutting' (later influenced by French plante) and plantare 'plant, fix in a place'.

Derivatives

plantable

adjective
More example sentences
  • Available in four colors (exposed aggregate, buff/tan, gray, and terra cotta), the system consists of different plantable retaining blocks and a Posi-Dura geosynthetic fabric system.
  • Ferretti says all vine crops can be transplanted if plantable containers or plastic pop-out containers are used, so gardeners can buy starter plants from garden centers or grow their own from seed.
  • The increasingly popular living trees are in short supply, so growth prospects for this business are strong, especially since the farm uses only 100 of its 250 plantable acres.

plantlet

noun
More example sentences
  • When the plantlets are ready to transplant, they are simply removed by pushing the base of the cell and dislodging soil and rootball together, avoiding tedious pricking out and minimising root disturbance.
  • Watering will eventually cause cardboard egg boxes to disintegrate, but by then, the young plantlets' roots should have grown sufficiently to bond everything together.
  • Even back in my days as a horticultural hooligan, I only ever used peat to create a home-made compost for sowing seeds, never for potting plantlets or decorating borders.

plantlike

adjective
More example sentences
  • Because both groups include organisms that have both animal-like and plant-like characteristics, the classification and phylogentic relationships within the groups are beset with complexities.
  • Red tide, she says, is a natural phenomenon caused by a microscopic plant-like single cell organism (a dinoflagellate) that blooms annually as part of its growth cycle.
  • The cellulose cell walls formed during their development, and the presence of reproductive spores are plant-like, whereas the cell movements involved in their morphogenesis are animal-like.

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