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pock

Syllabification: pock
Pronunciation: /päk
 
/

Definition of pock in English:

noun

A pockmark.
Example sentences
  • He was a strange-looking man, olived-skinned face marked with scars and pocks from unknown battles.
  • The lesions resemble small pocks - tiny, pus-filled blisters most prominent on the face, arms and legs.
  • Her head was bare again, and marked by tiny red pocks.

Origin

Old English poc 'pustule', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pok and German Pocke. Compare with pox.

Derivatives

pocked

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • In some places the stone is pocked and scarred by the corrosive effects of black sulphates.
  • Their sides were pocked and scarred.
  • He thanked the medical staff who determined he had been poisoned, which caused him extreme internal pain and left his face pocked and grey.

pocky

2
adjective
( archaic )
Example sentences
  • At Bury St Edmunds, Faith Wilson told her neighbour in 1619 to ‘pull up your muffler higher and hide your pocky face’.
  • So this winter has been a constant deluge of flyers warning about weird rashes and red throats and pocky skin and the nasty stomach virus that wouldn't die.

Definition of pock in:

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Pronunciation: ˈɛmjʊləs
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seeking to emulate someone or something