Definition of pointe in English:

pointe

Syllabification: pointe
Pronunciation: /point, pwaNt
 
 
/

noun (plural pronunc. same)

Ballet
  • 1The tips of the toes.
    More example sentences
    • Her pointes spark; her arms rise as if unveiling sculpture; and, when her leg swings out into a forthright arabesque, it's like a candid remark from the young, the bright, and the beautiful.
    • Since the women had on pointe shoes we were given the treat of silent pointes.
    • It was that Bengal tiger of a ballerina, Sofiane Sylve, stalking onstage on steely pointes, as if France itself had come to explicate this most elusive of texts.
  • 1.1 (also pointe work) Dance performed on the tips of the toes.
    More example sentences
    • Only the steps of the Bouronville technique were taught - very little pointe work and little or no partnering or character dances - and academic study was often sacrificed to preparation for small parts in performances.
    • What Joffrey observers often admire most now is the beauty and fineness of the women's pointe work, so essential for dancing Balanchine.
    • Like much of Forsythe's choreography, Duo transformed pointe work from something ethereal into something earthy.

Phrases

on (or en) pointe

/äN, än, ôn/ On the tips of the toes.
More example sentences
  • But if I can show a company dancing fantastically on pointe and off, then we'll hook our audiences.
  • Children should not be encouraged to dance on pointe without adequate training and mastered strength techniques.
  • If she were a ballerina dancing on pointe, she'd add a whole foot to her height (pardon the pun).

Origin

French, literally 'tip'.

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