There are 4 definitions of pole in English:

pole1

Syllabification: pole
Pronunciation: /pōl
 
/

noun

1A long, slender, rounded piece of wood or metal, typically used with one end placed in the ground as a support for something: a tent pole
More example sentences
  • But the Transport Research Laboratory has been working on a breakable fence with metal pins between the pole and support.
  • The piece is based on a flock of birds in flight - long white poles support wing-shaped metal triangles in a curved line which echoes the movement of a flock.
  • Another year passes and not so much as a tent pole in the ground.
Synonyms
post, pillar; telephone pole, utility pole; stanchion, paling, stake, stick, support, prop, batten, bar, rail, rod, beam; staff, stave, cane, baton
1.1 Track & Field A long, slender, flexible rod of wood or fiberglass used by a competitor in pole-vaulting.
More example sentences
  • The way they make them now is with fibreglass, rather like old-fashioned pole-vault poles.
  • During the pole vault, his pole snapped, sending him crashing on to the mat head first.
  • Previous competitions also used poles made out of ash wood which was not flexible, and athletes would sort of climb up the pole as they jumped.
1.2 short for ski pole.
More example sentences
  • Toko will also introduce a cross country ski pole tube to protect poles while in transit.
  • I ski a wide stance with short poles, with a pole always in the snow.
  • Visually impaired skiers follow the sound of the guide's skis and poles on the snow.
1.3A wooden shaft fitted to the front of a cart or carriage drawn by animals and attached to their yokes or collars.
1.4A simple fishing rod.
More example sentences
  • There is, however, a Byzantium illustration depicting what appears to be a fishing rod or pole.
  • Then, lift the pole so the hook and the bulk shot is clear of the water.
  • Year-round you'll find young fishing enthusiasts as well as elderly fishermen relaxing on the wooden pier with their poles and bait.
2chiefly British historical A linear or square rod.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Propel (a boat) by pushing a pole against the bottom of a river, canal, or lake.
More example sentences
  • If, for example, after grounding the operator tries to power off instead of calling for assistance or poling the boat to deeper water, it will create a ‘blow hole’ in the grass bed about the size of the hull.
  • Parvat stopped poling the boat and thought for a moment.
  • Kartik and Sanyas take turns poling the boat, the pole dramatic against the sky.

Origin

late Old English pāl (in early use without reference to thickness or length), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch paal and German Pfahl, based on Latin palus 'stake'.

Phrases

under bare poles

Sailing With no sail set.
More example sentences
  • Even under bare poles a sailboat will heel right over, at least to decks awash, in hurricane force conditions.
  • It's powering under bare poles on a day which is ideal for all sail aloft and, unless I've forgotten what she looks like, that's surely Crusty Lady Lily heading for the Gap.
  • Sails were down and it was running under bare poles before the wind.

Definition of pole in:

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Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: niːˈɒt(ə)ni
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal

There are 4 definitions of pole in English:

pole2

Syllabification: pole
Pronunciation: /pōl
 
/

noun

1Either of the two locations ( North Pole or South Pole) on the surface of the earth (or of a celestial object) that are the northern and southern ends of the axis of rotation. See also celestial pole, magnetic pole.
More example sentences
  • The logic of the correction was to visualise a human form straddling the celestial North Pole and orientated with his feet toward the ground.
  • Moreover, depending on the station's location relative to the pole and the season, it could be subject to extended periods of darkness.
  • In the polar world, there are three classic expeditions, the North Pole, the South Pole and the Greenland Ice Cap.
1.1 Geometry Either of the two points at which the axis of a sphere intersects its surface.
More example sentences
  • Like the lines of longitude on Earth, each great circle eventually intersects with every other great circle at the poles of the sphere.
  • Ibrahim proves in this work that the stereographic projection maps circles which do not pass through the pole of projection onto circles.
  • You could try simply pushing the poles of a sphere toward each other, as if to make them pass through each other and change places.
1.2 Geometry A fixed point to which other points or lines are referred, e.g., the origin of polar coordinates or the point of which a line or curve is a polar.
More example sentences
  • Sturm's theoretical work in mathematical physics involved the study of caustic curves, and poles and polars of conic sections.
  • His development of the pole and polar lines associated with conics led to the principle of duality.
  • Hence, we can produce poles, polars, points, geodesics, angles, and so forth readily by converting back to the Poincare model.
1.3 Biology An extremity of the main axis of a cell, organ, or part.
More example sentences
  • The PAS-protein stain revealed that the cells at the shoot pole have a dense cytoplasm.
  • Kinetochore microtubule bundles link sister chromosomes to the poles.
  • The cytoplasm at the posterior pole is distinguished by large organelles, the polar granules, which contain both proteins and RNAs.
1.4Each of the two opposite points on the surface of a magnet at which magnetic forces are strongest.
More example sentences
  • Physically, they were like the opposite poles of a magnet.
  • This attraction is similar to that of two opposite poles of a magnet.
  • Accountability to the Treasury is the opposite pole of the magnet to entrepreneurial spirit.
1.5Each of two terminals (positive and negative) of an electric cell, battery, or machine.
More example sentences
  • Water molecules have poles of positive and negative electric charge that are known to create attractive forces between cells, known as van der Waals forces.
1.6One of two opposed or contradictory principles or ideas: Miriam and Rebecca represent two poles in the argument about transracial adoption
More example sentences
  • Two recent front page stories in this newspaper represent the poles of opinion on crime and punishment.
  • After the fiery blast of energy that revitalized popular music-making, artists moved to the opposite pole.
  • This zero-degree photography embodied the opposite pole of the daguerreotype's infinite clarity.
Synonyms
extremity, extreme, limit, antipode

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin polus 'end of an axis', from Greek polos 'pivot, axis, sky'.

Phrases

be poles apart

Have nothing in common.
More example sentences
  • Given that politically, we are poles apart, there is quite a lot of common ground.
  • In its emphasis on self-knowledge gained through the study of poetry and heroes, Emerson's idea of self-reliance is poles apart from the modern notion of self-esteem.
  • If you've never watched it live before, do it at some point in your life - it'll make you realise why this country and the US will always be poles apart, but why we're all bred to have a soft spot for Hollywood in the first place.
Synonyms
completely different, directly opposed, antithetical, incompatible, irreconcilable, worlds apart, at opposite extremes

Derivatives

poleward

adjective
More example sentences
  • High mountain ranges, especially those with a large north - south frontage, act as barriers to east - west circulation and force the atmospheric circulation into poleward diversions.
  • But in the short-term, poleward range expansions of temperate-zone species will provide the major mechanism by which boreal and arctic diversity might increase.
  • The relatively constant speed of a chromosome during poleward and antipoleward motion is difficult to explain from the behavior of conventional ATP-dependent motor proteins.

polewards

adjective & adverb

Definition of pole in:

There are 4 definitions of pole in English:

pole3

Syllabification: pole
Pronunciation: /pōl
 
/

noun

Short for pole position.
More example sentences
  • Hearn, who like Schmidt resides in Henderson, Nev., has a victory and two poles in the IndyCar Series.
  • But now to come here and drive for a team that is as big as it is with the Rahal-Letterman and to get not only their first pole for them at Homestead, it was my first pole, and now it's all of our first poles here again at Indy.
  • He started from the pole and captured the checkered flag driving a truck for Richard Childress.

Definition of pole in:

There are 4 definitions of pole in English:

Pole4

Syllabification: Pole
Pronunciation: /pōl
 
/

noun

A native or inhabitant of Poland, or a person of Polish descent.
More example sentences
  • Right-wing renegades - an English-speaker and a Pole, rather than Afrikaners - were responsible.
  • What about the Indians, the Pakistanis, the Italians, the Poles and the English.
  • Our films speak only to 40 million Poles in Poland and a few more millions abroad.

Origin

via German from Polish Polanie, literally 'field-dwellers', from pole 'field'.

Definition of pole in: