Definition of poll in English:

poll

Syllabification: poll
Pronunciation: /pōl
 
/

noun

1 (often the polls) The process of voting in an election: the country went to the polls on March 10
More example sentences
  • Weeks of political campaigning comes to an end today as voters across the country go to the polls in the general election.
  • Such a defeat would further damage its chances of maintaining power at a national level when Indians go to the polls for general elections due by 2004.
  • As Australia prepares to go to the polls for a general election on Saturday, Howard continues to defend his government's tough stance on asylum seekers.
Synonyms
1.1A record of the number of votes cast in an election.
More example sentences
  • Blackie Gavin, who topped the polls at the last elections, reached the quota after the third count, needing just one vote after the second.
  • Boxer Karunaratne topped the polls receiving 66,412 votes, obtaining a majority of over 14,000 votes over his closest rival.
  • Despite losing the election, Sinn Fein's Colm Burns was in buoyant mood, pointing to the fact he topped the polls at the first count.
Synonyms
voting figures, vote, returns, count, tally
1.2 (the polls) The places where votes are cast in an election: the polls have only just closed
More example sentences
  • Dixville Notch takes advantage of a state election law that allows communities to close the polls after all registered voters have cast their ballots.
  • With regard to Chipepa Polling Station, the poll closed 34 minutes before the gazetted time of 1700 hours.
  • At 17: 00 hours he made an announcement outside the Polling Station that the poll was closing.
1.3 short for opinion poll.
More example sentences
  • Vice President Gore moved into a lead in the polls after the Democratic convention, where he adopted the posture of a populist opponent of powerful corporate interests.
  • Even Winston Peters is heading the leader of the National Party in the polls at the moment.
  • Generally the incumbent wins preferred PM, even if they're heading for a landslide loss and the voting intention polls point to that loss.
Synonyms
2 dialect A person’s head.
More example sentences
  • Peter scratched his poll and smiled feebly.
  • ‘Come, Trueboy,’ said the man with the hat on his poll.
2.1The part of the head on which hair grows; the scalp.
More example sentences
  • His head is crowned with a rough Shushah or tuft of hair on the poll; his face is of a dirty brown.
  • A favorite ‘fash’ (i.e., fashion) is to scrape off a parallelogram behind the head, from the poll to the cerebellum.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Record the opinion or vote of: focus groups in which customers are polled about merchandise preferences
More example sentences
  • Some of the advisers who are polled for their opinions use sentiment indicators when forecasting.
  • This year, nearly 11,000 business leaders were polled in a record 117 economies worldwide.
  • A random sample of 2,646 people across all regions of England, including the capital, was polled by Opinion Research Business.
Synonyms
canvass, survey, ask, question, interview, ballot
1.1 [no object] (Of a candidate in an election) receive a specified number of votes: the Green candidate polled 3.6 percent
More example sentences
  • Despite all this, Jack McCann gained the most votes, polling an impressive 22,000.
  • The vice president who polls the most votes may not necessarily get picked as the next deputy PM.
  • Keira has always been safe Labor, but last state election Martin did get a pretty sizeable chunk of the vote - he polled a fairly close second to Campbell, and should have given them a scare.
Synonyms
get, gain, register, record, return
1.2 Telecommunications & Computing Check the status of (a measuring device, part of a computer, or a node in a network), especially as part of a repeated cycle.
More example sentences
  • Old and crude methods for this required the software to poll the device continuously for status and changes.
  • A management system identifies conditions on the network by periodically polling the network devices or in response to a message from a network device.
  • With serialized devices it should be possible to poll every compromised device on the Net just like using a traffic camera to catch drivers who run red lights.
2Cut the horns off (an animal, especially a young cow).
More example sentences
  • As an added bonus, every Thunderhouse calf born to date has been polled!
  • All his calves have been polled.
  • She is polled and two out of the three kids each year have been polled.
2.1 archaic Cut off the top of (a tree or plant), typically to encourage further growth; pollard.
More example sentences
  • Now the idiot Parson has polled them into wretched stumps.
  • The black poplar is frequently pollar'd when as big as one's arm, eight or nine foot from the ground, as they trim them in Italy, for their vines to serpent and twist on, and those they poll, or head every second year, sparing the middle, streight, and thrivingest shoot, and at the third year cut him also.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'head'): perhaps of Low German origin. The original sense was 'head', and hence 'an individual person among a number', from which developed the sense 'number of people ascertained by counting of heads' and then 'counting of heads or of votes' (17th century).

Derivatives

pollee

Pronunciation: /pōˈlē/
noun
sense 1 of the verb.
More example sentences
  • We don't know precisely what instructions were given the pollees, in particular whether they were told to ignore works of fiction, but it's interesting that there are none on the list.
  • As of 5 p.m., 52% of ballots have been counted and showed 90% of the pollees want to stay in Indonesia, 9.05% want to return home and the rest indicated no preference on the ballot paper.
  • The UK managed just over a third of pollees admitting to giving forth, narrowly beating the whingeing Aussies into third spot with 30 per cent.

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude