Definition of pomander in English:

pomander

Syllabification: po·man·der
Pronunciation: /pōˈmandər
 
, ˈpōˌmandər
 
/

noun

1A ball or perforated container of sweet-smelling substances such as herbs and spices, placed in a closet, drawer, or room to perfume the air or (formerly) carried as a supposed protection against infection.
More example sentences
  • The younger bridesmaids wore pale lilac shimmer satin dresses with cream embroidered bodices, and carried pomanders of lilac and cream flowers.
  • The pomander - a small perforated container filled with spices and herbs and worn on the body - was meant to provide a continuous fragrant shield against disease.
  • My younger sister put it better after arriving back from school at Christmas, clutching a pomander that she's made herself.
1.1A piece of fruit, typically an orange or apple, studded with cloves and hung in a closet by a ribbon for a similar purpose.
More example sentences
  • Blue Peter recommends sticking them into oranges to form a pomander, an archaic device to keep linen clothes fresh and sweet-smelling.
  • Ladies first had small sack handbags that contained pomanders (scented oranges).
  • To tie everything together, choose flowers in colors that coordinate with your other decorations - here, the apricot-colored rose echoes a dried orange pomander set in a pot with a tiny evergreen tree.

Origin

late 15th century: from Old French pome d'embre, from medieval Latin pomum de ambra 'apple of ambergris'.

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into Spanish
Word of the day dinkum
Pronunciation: ˈdɪŋkəm
adjective
(of an article or person) genuine, honest, true