Definition of pomp in English:

pomp

Syllabification: pomp
Pronunciation: /pämp
 
/

noun

1Ceremony and splendid display, especially at a public event: St. Paul’s was perfectly adapted to pomp and circumstance
More example sentences
  • The celebration was a grand display of pomp and circumstance led by the students of the school.
  • The very first episode shows a Europe immersed in the grandeur of pomp and circumstance.
  • The event took place with a flourish of military pomp and ceremony, and army officers wore black armbands in memory of the Queen Mother.
Synonyms
ceremony, ceremonial, solemnity, ritual, display, spectacle, pageantry; show, showiness, ostentation, splendor, grandeur, magnificence, majesty, stateliness, glory, opulence, brilliance, drama, resplendence, splendidness
informal razzmatazz
1.1 (pomps) archaic Ostentatious boastfulness or vanity: the pomps and vanities of this world
More example sentences
  • In a sense the tricolour had been colonised by a small grouping bringing murder and mayhem in their wake and such was the antipathy of the general population to the Provos and all their pomps that the national flag was almost sidelined.
  • It is time to call its bluff and close down the entire trough by abolishing the Arts Council and all its works and pomps.
  • All the hideous excrescences that have overgrown our modern life, the pomps and conventions and dreary solemnities, dread nothing so much as the flash of laughter which, like lightning, shrivels them up and leaves the bones bare.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French pompe, via Latin from Greek pompē 'procession, pomp', from pempein 'send'.

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