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probate

Syllabification: pro·bate
Pronunciation: /ˈprōˌbāt
 
/

Definition of probate in English:

noun

1The official proving of a will: the will was in probate [as modifier]: a probate court
More example sentences
  • Finally there were courts administering family and probate matters, which had inherited their jurisdiction from the ecclesiastical courts, and the Court of Admiralty.
  • I do not accept that a rate ascertained in that way is a fair measure for a solicitor's hourly rate in dealing with a quite complicated probate matter.
  • A $20 million scam that involved a forged grant of administration from the High Court probate office has been reported to the Garda Bureau of Fraud Investigation.
1.1A verified copy of a will with a certificate as handed to the executors.
Example sentences
  • There will be workshops each day and talks on a variety of subjects, including how to research your family history online, how to use the Census, service records, wills and probates.
  • Oddly, the reply refers to only 12 probates from San Francisco, in contrast to the ‘few hundred’ he claimed to have examined when Seckora interviewed him.
  • Hood draws upon probates, tax records, account books, newspaper ads, tax records and other government records in a study that contributes to social and family history as well as economic history and the history of technology.

verb

[with object] North American Back to top  
Establish the validity of (a will).
Example sentences
  • You will either need to conduct a normal probate, commonly known as an independent administration, or you might be able to conduct a simplified form of probate called probating the will as a muniment of title.
  • For instance, one or both of your parents' estates may need to be probated, estate and inheritance taxes may need to be paid, the property may be subject to a mortgage, there may be title issues, or your brother may have a judgment against him.
  • However, when a will is probated as a muniment of title, inventories are not filed.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin probatum 'something proved', neuter past participle of probare 'to test, prove'.

More
  • proof from (Middle English):

    This came via Old French proeve from Latin probare, ‘to test or prove’. Proof spirit or 100 per cent proof spirit was originally defined as a solution of alcohol that will ignite when mixed with gunpowder—in Britain this meant an alcohol content of 57.07 per cent. In the expression the proof of the pudding is in the eating, proof is used in the sense ‘test’ rather than ‘verification, proving to be true’. Probare is also the source of prove (Middle English), probe (Late Middle English), probate (Late Middle English) where you have to prove the will in law, and probation (Late Middle English) which is a form of testing.

Words that rhyme with probate

jailbaitrebatewhitebait

Definition of probate in:

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