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profuse

Syllabification: pro·fuse
Pronunciation: /prəˈfyo͞os
 
/

Definition of profuse in English:

adjective

1(Especially of something offered or discharged) exuberantly plentiful; abundant: I offered my profuse apologies
More example sentences
  • Amid profuse offers of distilled beverages, baloney sandwiches, and hard-boiled eggs, I got in the car and drove off.
  • After one outburst, Flaubert offered profuse apologies and swore never again to behave as he had.
  • I have been offered a profuse apology by the individual concerned, and I have accepted it.
Synonyms
informal over the top, gushy
1.1 archaic (Of a person) lavish; extravagant: they are profuse in hospitality
More example sentences
  • My brother and his wife were profuse in their appreciation.
  • Besides, politicians were profuse enough, serving mostly to stagnate government and delay any true progress.
  • I was born into a family profuse in its ambition but lacking in its activism.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'extravagant'): from Latin profusus 'lavish, spread out', past participle of profundere, from pro- 'forth' + fundere 'pour'.

Derivatives

profusely

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • As things stand we use it profusely and higher prices might tend to discourage us from using the oven to make a piece of toast.
  • The national broadcaster had to apologise profusely for the lapse.
  • I took the picture off the website and apologized profusely and am doing so again here.

profuseness

2
noun

Definition of profuse in:

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Pronunciation: ˈɛmjʊləs
adjective
seeking to emulate someone or something