Definition of propaganda in English:

propaganda

Syllabification: prop·a·gan·da
Pronunciation: /ˌpräpəˈɡandə
 
/

noun

1chiefly derogatory Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view: he was charged with distributing enemy propaganda
More example sentences
  • Of course, an evil regime will attempt to use our views for its propaganda.
  • Most blogs are a form of personal propaganda, stating views in an authoritative tone.
  • He then went on to use this view as propaganda to control people and make them feel what he was doing was right.
Synonyms
information, promotion, advertising, publicity, spin;
disinformation, counter-information
historical agitprop
informal info, hype, plugging
1.1The dissemination of propaganda as a political strategy: the party’s leaders believed that a long period of education and propaganda would be necessary
More example sentences
  • This stands, as we shall see, in a long tradition of propaganda by deed.
  • The miners were no angels but the media was blatantly and cynically used as a propaganda machine for the government.
  • The third method is to set up a system of accountability for propaganda work.

Origin

Italian, from modern Latin congregatio de propaganda fide 'congregation for propagation of the faith' (sense 2). sense 1 dates from the early 20th century.

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