There are 2 definitions of pull in in English:

pull in1

1(Of a vehicle or its driver) move to the side of or off the road: he pulled in at the curb
More example sentences
  • As I pulled in to the side of the road, the crisis quickly vanished.
  • When the vehicle pulls in, service personnel know what's wrong and can immediately fix it without spending time doing unnecessary tests.
  • Trucks pulled in on the other side of the dirt road and Bo nodded to them as they waved in her direction.
2(Of a bus or train) arrive to take passengers.
More example sentences
  • There is a 30-minute wait standing in the cold on Platform 3 before the train finally pulls in at 3.45 pm.
  • A train pulls in to the Angus ‘ghost’ station early in the morning and another calls late at night.
  • Westminster station is unusually busy, and when the Richmond train pulls in, there's nowhere to sit.
See parent entry: pull

Definition of pull in in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

There are 2 definitions of pull in in English:

pull-in2

Syllabification: pull-in
Pronunciation: /ˈpo͝olˌin/

noun

1An area at the side of the road where motorists may pull off the road and stop.
More example sentences
  • Councillor M. Smith asked if the post box situated at The Butts could perhaps be moved down to the Leaslow pull-in as a matter of road safety.
  • The company also agreed to create four pull-in bays for trucks awaiting oil shipments to ensure they do not interfere with traffic flow in the area.
  • By the time I made it to the bus pull-in, I was granted a mouthful of exhaust from the last bus that left.
1.1 dated A roadside cafe.

Definition of pull in in: