Definition of quag in English:

quag

Syllabification: quag
Pronunciation: /kwag
 
/

noun

archaic
  • A marshy or boggy place.
    More example sentences
    • The entire region plunged into deep chaos and a nation was caught up in a deep quag, that it is still finding itself difficult to extricate from.
    • Both tires have deep, conical lugs that grip like a colony of leeches but are spaced well-enough apart to shed even the most adhesive quag with ease.
    • The only good thing about your garden becoming a quag is that the weeds pull up really easily.

Derivatives

quaggy

adjective
More example sentences
  • However, there is one interesting thing about wild, remote, quaggy old Isle of Lewis.
  • The path itself, or rather the portion of more solid ground on which the travellers half walked, half waded, was rough, broken, and in many places quaggy and unsound.
  • We came at last to a bit of quaggy road, which one man, by making a dash as over thin ice, might possibly have got through; for six men and a stretcher this was impossible.

Origin

late 16th century: related to dialect quag 'shake, quiver'; probably symbolic, the qu- suggesting movement (as in quake and quick).

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