There are 2 definitions of rave in English:

rave1

Syllabification: rave
Pronunciation: /rāv
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Talk wildly or incoherently, as if one were delirious or insane: Nancy’s having hysterics and raving about a black ghost
    More example sentences
    • The Prime Minister raved incoherently: ‘I see myself as the big fat spider in the corner of the room.’
    • The Pythia would rave and babble incoherently.
    • When he succeeded in waking us up, we had been completely incoherent, raving about caves and pigeons and dark unspeakable evil.
    Synonyms
    talk wildly, babble, jabber, talk incoherently
  • 1.1Address someone in an angry, uncontrolled way: [with direct speech]: “Never mind how he feels!” Melissa raved
    More example sentences
    • Sure, the lyrics are angry, bitter, raving, mad, obscene, and a 1000 other adjectives, but they don't change my opinion.
    • He was then standing in the street ranting and raving and my dad asked him to move out the way, and the guy said he would be back.
    • Mr Welling said: ‘The defendant telephoned her and he was abusive, ranting and raving.’
    Synonyms
    rant, rant and rave, rage, lose one's temper, storm, fulminate, fume; shout, roar, thunder, bellow
    informal fly off the handle, blow one's top, hit the roof, flip one's wig
  • 2Speak or write about someone or something with great enthusiasm or admiration: New York’s theater critics raved about the acting
    More example sentences
    • That said, nearly all the guests I spoke to raved about their excursions, claiming they were the highlight of their holiday.
    • Salthouse had the critics raving about their last album ‘Dream by Day’.
    • Critics are already raving about the new Channel Four programme ‘Shameless’, which hits the screen tonight.
    Synonyms
    praise enthusiastically, go into raptures about/over, wax lyrical about, sing the praises of, rhapsodize over, enthuse about/over, acclaim, eulogize, extol, overpraise
    informal ballyhoo
    formal laud
    archaic panegyrize
  • 3 informal Attend or take part in a rave (party).
    More example sentences
    • Viewers watch aliens rave at a dance party, float off into space while fireworks explode, and witness a fiery kaleidoscope descending from overhead.
    • We remember one party near Jerusalem, thousands of people were raving like hell inside an ancient cave.
    • Beat it out and we pulse together, it's a wonder we don't rave daily.

noun

Back to top  
  • 1 informal An extremely enthusiastic recommendation or appraisal of someone or something: the film has won raves from American reviewers [as modifier]: their recent tour received rave reviews
    More example sentences
    • And though his realistic and hard-hitting film has won some rave reviews, Tigmanshu is certainly not resting on his laurels.
    • Performing at the Cotton Club, the girls won rave reviews from critics.
    • It is listed on the Australian and US stock markets and has won rave reviews for its financial performances.
    Synonyms
    enthusiastic praise, lavish praise, a rapturous reception, tribute, plaudits, acclaimvery enthusiastic, rapturous, glowing, ecstatic, excellent, highly favorable
  • 2 informal A lively party or gathering involving dancing and drinking: their annual fancy-dress rave
  • 2.1A party or event attended by large numbers of young people, involving drug use and dancing to fast, electronic music.
    More example sentences
    • I've been into raves and electronic music since the early '90s, and I can tell you that there is no other music scene that can boast this.
    • The music at this event had not been as loud as at previous raves.
    • There were more performance-enhancing drugs going down than at an all-night rave.
  • 2.2Electronic dance music of the kind played at a rave.
    More example sentences
    • Rather than defining genres, Skinner explores them, intersecting garage and hip-hop with rave, reggae, and even a twinge of bedsit indie.
    • It's got techno, trance, rave, hip hop, and lots of other types of music in the different mixes.
    • Music was up beat, perfect for dancing, mixing with techno, rave, electric and pop.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'show signs of madness'): probably from Old Northern French raver; related obscurely to (Middle) Low German reven 'be senseless, rave'.

More definitions of rave

Definition of rave in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmeɪlstrəm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea

There are 2 definitions of rave in English:

rave2

Syllabification: rave
Pronunciation: /
 
rāv/

noun

  • 1A rail of a cart.
  • 1.1 (raves) A permanent or removable framework added to the sides of a cart to increase its capacity.

Origin

mid 16th century: variant of the synonymous dialect word rathe, of unknown origin.

More definitions of rave

Definition of rave in: