Definition of receptive in English:

receptive

Syllabification: re·cep·tive
Pronunciation: /rəˈseptiv
 
/

adjective

1Able or willing to receive something, especially signals or stimuli.
More example sentences
  • Exfoliation removes dead skin cells, embedded dirt and toxins, and stimulates the skin, making it receptive to the nutrient-rich facial mask that should follow.
  • Considerable flowering asynchrony among fig trees in any population increases the likelihood that a fig wasp emerging at any time of year will be able to locate a receptive fig.
  • Sensory isolation creates an alert and receptive state of mind, so floatation works well combined with hypnotherapy to treat smoking and weight problems
1.1Willing to consider or accept new suggestions and ideas: a receptive audience the institution was receptive to new ideas
More example sentences
  • To his credit, he has had an excellent rapport with the selectors, who find him quite receptive to ideas and suggestions from various quarters.
  • You have to show yourselves as people with open minds, receptive to the ideas of independent voices in the boardroom.
  • They were both extremely interested and receptive to my ideas.
Synonyms
open-minded, responsive, amenable, well disposed, flexible, approachable, accessible
archaic susceptive
1.2(Of a female animal) ready to mate.
More example sentences
  • While grooming, the male flying fox keeps his genitals exposed, indicating to nearby females that he is receptive to mating.
  • Estrus is the period when the female is sexually receptive and breeding can occur.
  • Thus, downwind males could be located higher in the vegetation to increase their chances of intercepting a pheromone plume and locating a receptive female.

Derivatives

receptively

adverb
More example sentences
  • Given that scores were based only on stimulus words that the child could receptively recognize, it is not surprising that the correct pronunciation was almost always judged to be acceptable.
  • The little thing crooned deeply, and opened its mouth receptively to be fed.
  • If you have a stack of papers to get through, I still suggest that you first read a couple of them receptively, without doing anything to them, to get a sense for what students are doing and how the assignment worked.

receptiveness

noun
More example sentences
  • Based on the physician's response and receptiveness, the victim may or may not choose to tell others.
  • There's been a huge receptiveness to this event, which is what makes it that much more likable from our perspective.
  • This receptiveness led him to spend more time in Berlin and now, with a pregnant girlfriend there and a gallery that eagerly promotes his work, he has made the city his second home.

receptivity

Pronunciation: /ˌrēˌsepˈtivətē/
noun
More example sentences
  • The more deeply your marketing connects with what people value and their sensibilities, the more receptivity there is to your product and the greater the response.
  • This creates an overabundance of serotonin, and the brain responds either by reducing receptivity to serotonin or by reducing the production of serotonin.
  • So the audience is preselected for its receptivity to the message.

Definition of receptive in:

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected